Who:
Vienna-based Anna Kohlweis. cartoonist, illustrator, maker of music videos, songwriter, singer, music producer, dream journal keeper, passionate eater of salads and feta cheese.
Supplies:
black Pilot G-Tec-C4
black Pilot V5 Hi-Techpoint
black Pilot V7 Hi-Techpoint
Faber-Castell 0.5 mechanical pencil
whatever eraser i can find
OLFA 30° graphic art knife
Schmincke watercolors
assorted fine mid-price paintbrushes
Daler Rowney system3 white acrylic paint
170g Dorée drawing paper
vintage photographs found on flea markets and in antique shops
old books and book pages
Why do I love these supplies?The pilot pens are just my favorite. They are very fine, smooth and just great to work with. I kept coming back to them over the past years, so now I just decided to stick with them for a while.
I like mechanical pencils because after I had been drawing a lot with colored pencils in the past years (I don’t really do that a lot these days, so i left them out in the picture), I got really fed up with sharpening them. Also, mechanical pencils are just way better for drawing while traveling and even when I am stuck at home, I like to pretend I am somewhere else, so here we go. At least in my head I am traveling.The Schmincke watercolors I use are very dear to me – I’ve been using my late grandfather’s since I started using watercolors for my work. Some of the pots are new, but a lot are still his. My grandfather taught me how to draw human faces - we would sit by the table in his flat, painting and drawing together when I was a kid. Using his supplies brings me back to this and i couldn’t wish for a better way to honor this memory.
I use acrylics to paint on old photographs and book pages that I find, and it’s mostly white paint. I tend to buy a big pot of whatever is on sale, but the system3 one is pretty great. I might stick with it.When it comes to paper, I like to use one that is affordable, thick, off-white and that can handle fine sketches as well as watercolors. The Dorée paper that i tend to use comes in many sizes and in thick pads. Every time i use something nicer and more expensive, I fuck up. Too much pressure! I bought some nice watercolor paper for a book project I want to start soon, though, hoping that it will work out anyway.
I also work with video and I use my Panasonic Lumix gh2 for filming. For obvious photographic reasons, it is not in the picture.My work space is kinda small and it is my space for drawing, painting, video editing as well as recording music. When I decide to to the latter, it changes a bit – microphones, guitars, audio interfaces and keyboards (you can see a MicroKorg peeking out from under the desk) occupy the space. Whatever I do at that table, I have postcards, photographs and notes by people dear to me stuck on the wall next to it.If I also want to draw during times of recording music, I mostly move my art supplies over to the dinner/coffee table. That sometimes means that I have to move dinner/coffee over to the bed. One day I am gonna have enough space for two desks. Maybe three. Hell, a room full of desks! Who:
Vienna-based Anna Kohlweis. cartoonist, illustrator, maker of music videos, songwriter, singer, music producer, dream journal keeper, passionate eater of salads and feta cheese.
Supplies:
black Pilot G-Tec-C4
black Pilot V5 Hi-Techpoint
black Pilot V7 Hi-Techpoint
Faber-Castell 0.5 mechanical pencil
whatever eraser i can find
OLFA 30° graphic art knife
Schmincke watercolors
assorted fine mid-price paintbrushes
Daler Rowney system3 white acrylic paint
170g Dorée drawing paper
vintage photographs found on flea markets and in antique shops
old books and book pages
Why do I love these supplies?The pilot pens are just my favorite. They are very fine, smooth and just great to work with. I kept coming back to them over the past years, so now I just decided to stick with them for a while.
I like mechanical pencils because after I had been drawing a lot with colored pencils in the past years (I don’t really do that a lot these days, so i left them out in the picture), I got really fed up with sharpening them. Also, mechanical pencils are just way better for drawing while traveling and even when I am stuck at home, I like to pretend I am somewhere else, so here we go. At least in my head I am traveling.The Schmincke watercolors I use are very dear to me – I’ve been using my late grandfather’s since I started using watercolors for my work. Some of the pots are new, but a lot are still his. My grandfather taught me how to draw human faces - we would sit by the table in his flat, painting and drawing together when I was a kid. Using his supplies brings me back to this and i couldn’t wish for a better way to honor this memory.
I use acrylics to paint on old photographs and book pages that I find, and it’s mostly white paint. I tend to buy a big pot of whatever is on sale, but the system3 one is pretty great. I might stick with it.When it comes to paper, I like to use one that is affordable, thick, off-white and that can handle fine sketches as well as watercolors. The Dorée paper that i tend to use comes in many sizes and in thick pads. Every time i use something nicer and more expensive, I fuck up. Too much pressure! I bought some nice watercolor paper for a book project I want to start soon, though, hoping that it will work out anyway.
I also work with video and I use my Panasonic Lumix gh2 for filming. For obvious photographic reasons, it is not in the picture.My work space is kinda small and it is my space for drawing, painting, video editing as well as recording music. When I decide to to the latter, it changes a bit – microphones, guitars, audio interfaces and keyboards (you can see a MicroKorg peeking out from under the desk) occupy the space. Whatever I do at that table, I have postcards, photographs and notes by people dear to me stuck on the wall next to it.If I also want to draw during times of recording music, I mostly move my art supplies over to the dinner/coffee table. That sometimes means that I have to move dinner/coffee over to the bed. One day I am gonna have enough space for two desks. Maybe three. Hell, a room full of desks! Who:
Vienna-based Anna Kohlweis. cartoonist, illustrator, maker of music videos, songwriter, singer, music producer, dream journal keeper, passionate eater of salads and feta cheese.
Supplies:
black Pilot G-Tec-C4
black Pilot V5 Hi-Techpoint
black Pilot V7 Hi-Techpoint
Faber-Castell 0.5 mechanical pencil
whatever eraser i can find
OLFA 30° graphic art knife
Schmincke watercolors
assorted fine mid-price paintbrushes
Daler Rowney system3 white acrylic paint
170g Dorée drawing paper
vintage photographs found on flea markets and in antique shops
old books and book pages
Why do I love these supplies?The pilot pens are just my favorite. They are very fine, smooth and just great to work with. I kept coming back to them over the past years, so now I just decided to stick with them for a while.
I like mechanical pencils because after I had been drawing a lot with colored pencils in the past years (I don’t really do that a lot these days, so i left them out in the picture), I got really fed up with sharpening them. Also, mechanical pencils are just way better for drawing while traveling and even when I am stuck at home, I like to pretend I am somewhere else, so here we go. At least in my head I am traveling.The Schmincke watercolors I use are very dear to me – I’ve been using my late grandfather’s since I started using watercolors for my work. Some of the pots are new, but a lot are still his. My grandfather taught me how to draw human faces - we would sit by the table in his flat, painting and drawing together when I was a kid. Using his supplies brings me back to this and i couldn’t wish for a better way to honor this memory.
I use acrylics to paint on old photographs and book pages that I find, and it’s mostly white paint. I tend to buy a big pot of whatever is on sale, but the system3 one is pretty great. I might stick with it.When it comes to paper, I like to use one that is affordable, thick, off-white and that can handle fine sketches as well as watercolors. The Dorée paper that i tend to use comes in many sizes and in thick pads. Every time i use something nicer and more expensive, I fuck up. Too much pressure! I bought some nice watercolor paper for a book project I want to start soon, though, hoping that it will work out anyway.
I also work with video and I use my Panasonic Lumix gh2 for filming. For obvious photographic reasons, it is not in the picture.My work space is kinda small and it is my space for drawing, painting, video editing as well as recording music. When I decide to to the latter, it changes a bit – microphones, guitars, audio interfaces and keyboards (you can see a MicroKorg peeking out from under the desk) occupy the space. Whatever I do at that table, I have postcards, photographs and notes by people dear to me stuck on the wall next to it.If I also want to draw during times of recording music, I mostly move my art supplies over to the dinner/coffee table. That sometimes means that I have to move dinner/coffee over to the bed. One day I am gonna have enough space for two desks. Maybe three. Hell, a room full of desks! Who:
Vienna-based Anna Kohlweis. cartoonist, illustrator, maker of music videos, songwriter, singer, music producer, dream journal keeper, passionate eater of salads and feta cheese.
Supplies:
black Pilot G-Tec-C4
black Pilot V5 Hi-Techpoint
black Pilot V7 Hi-Techpoint
Faber-Castell 0.5 mechanical pencil
whatever eraser i can find
OLFA 30° graphic art knife
Schmincke watercolors
assorted fine mid-price paintbrushes
Daler Rowney system3 white acrylic paint
170g Dorée drawing paper
vintage photographs found on flea markets and in antique shops
old books and book pages
Why do I love these supplies?The pilot pens are just my favorite. They are very fine, smooth and just great to work with. I kept coming back to them over the past years, so now I just decided to stick with them for a while.
I like mechanical pencils because after I had been drawing a lot with colored pencils in the past years (I don’t really do that a lot these days, so i left them out in the picture), I got really fed up with sharpening them. Also, mechanical pencils are just way better for drawing while traveling and even when I am stuck at home, I like to pretend I am somewhere else, so here we go. At least in my head I am traveling.The Schmincke watercolors I use are very dear to me – I’ve been using my late grandfather’s since I started using watercolors for my work. Some of the pots are new, but a lot are still his. My grandfather taught me how to draw human faces - we would sit by the table in his flat, painting and drawing together when I was a kid. Using his supplies brings me back to this and i couldn’t wish for a better way to honor this memory.
I use acrylics to paint on old photographs and book pages that I find, and it’s mostly white paint. I tend to buy a big pot of whatever is on sale, but the system3 one is pretty great. I might stick with it.When it comes to paper, I like to use one that is affordable, thick, off-white and that can handle fine sketches as well as watercolors. The Dorée paper that i tend to use comes in many sizes and in thick pads. Every time i use something nicer and more expensive, I fuck up. Too much pressure! I bought some nice watercolor paper for a book project I want to start soon, though, hoping that it will work out anyway.
I also work with video and I use my Panasonic Lumix gh2 for filming. For obvious photographic reasons, it is not in the picture.My work space is kinda small and it is my space for drawing, painting, video editing as well as recording music. When I decide to to the latter, it changes a bit – microphones, guitars, audio interfaces and keyboards (you can see a MicroKorg peeking out from under the desk) occupy the space. Whatever I do at that table, I have postcards, photographs and notes by people dear to me stuck on the wall next to it.If I also want to draw during times of recording music, I mostly move my art supplies over to the dinner/coffee table. That sometimes means that I have to move dinner/coffee over to the bed. One day I am gonna have enough space for two desks. Maybe three. Hell, a room full of desks! Who:
Vienna-based Anna Kohlweis. cartoonist, illustrator, maker of music videos, songwriter, singer, music producer, dream journal keeper, passionate eater of salads and feta cheese.
Supplies:
black Pilot G-Tec-C4
black Pilot V5 Hi-Techpoint
black Pilot V7 Hi-Techpoint
Faber-Castell 0.5 mechanical pencil
whatever eraser i can find
OLFA 30° graphic art knife
Schmincke watercolors
assorted fine mid-price paintbrushes
Daler Rowney system3 white acrylic paint
170g Dorée drawing paper
vintage photographs found on flea markets and in antique shops
old books and book pages
Why do I love these supplies?The pilot pens are just my favorite. They are very fine, smooth and just great to work with. I kept coming back to them over the past years, so now I just decided to stick with them for a while.
I like mechanical pencils because after I had been drawing a lot with colored pencils in the past years (I don’t really do that a lot these days, so i left them out in the picture), I got really fed up with sharpening them. Also, mechanical pencils are just way better for drawing while traveling and even when I am stuck at home, I like to pretend I am somewhere else, so here we go. At least in my head I am traveling.The Schmincke watercolors I use are very dear to me – I’ve been using my late grandfather’s since I started using watercolors for my work. Some of the pots are new, but a lot are still his. My grandfather taught me how to draw human faces - we would sit by the table in his flat, painting and drawing together when I was a kid. Using his supplies brings me back to this and i couldn’t wish for a better way to honor this memory.
I use acrylics to paint on old photographs and book pages that I find, and it’s mostly white paint. I tend to buy a big pot of whatever is on sale, but the system3 one is pretty great. I might stick with it.When it comes to paper, I like to use one that is affordable, thick, off-white and that can handle fine sketches as well as watercolors. The Dorée paper that i tend to use comes in many sizes and in thick pads. Every time i use something nicer and more expensive, I fuck up. Too much pressure! I bought some nice watercolor paper for a book project I want to start soon, though, hoping that it will work out anyway.
I also work with video and I use my Panasonic Lumix gh2 for filming. For obvious photographic reasons, it is not in the picture.My work space is kinda small and it is my space for drawing, painting, video editing as well as recording music. When I decide to to the latter, it changes a bit – microphones, guitars, audio interfaces and keyboards (you can see a MicroKorg peeking out from under the desk) occupy the space. Whatever I do at that table, I have postcards, photographs and notes by people dear to me stuck on the wall next to it.If I also want to draw during times of recording music, I mostly move my art supplies over to the dinner/coffee table. That sometimes means that I have to move dinner/coffee over to the bed. One day I am gonna have enough space for two desks. Maybe three. Hell, a room full of desks!

Who:

Vienna-based Anna Kohlweis. cartoonist, illustrator, maker of music videos, songwriter, singer, music producer, dream journal keeper, passionate eater of salads and feta cheese.

Supplies:

  • black Pilot G-Tec-C4
  • black Pilot V5 Hi-Techpoint
  • black Pilot V7 Hi-Techpoint
  • Faber-Castell 0.5 mechanical pencil
  • whatever eraser i can find
  • OLFA 30° graphic art knife
  • Schmincke watercolors
  • assorted fine mid-price paintbrushes
  • Daler Rowney system3 white acrylic paint
  • 170g Dorée drawing paper
  • vintage photographs found on flea markets and in antique shops
  • old books and book pages

Why do I love these supplies?

The pilot pens are just my favorite. They are very fine, smooth and just great to work with. I kept coming back to them over the past years, so now I just decided to stick with them for a while.

I like mechanical pencils because after I had been drawing a lot with colored pencils in the past years (I don’t really do that a lot these days, so i left them out in the picture), I got really fed up with sharpening them. Also, mechanical pencils are just way better for drawing while traveling and even when I am stuck at home, I like to pretend I am somewhere else, so here we go. At least in my head I am traveling.

The Schmincke watercolors I use are very dear to me – I’ve been using my late grandfather’s since I started using watercolors for my work. Some of the pots are new, but a lot are still his. My grandfather taught me how to draw human faces - we would sit by the table in his flat, painting and drawing together when I was a kid. Using his supplies brings me back to this and i couldn’t wish for a better way to honor this memory.

I use acrylics to paint on old photographs and book pages that I find, and it’s mostly white paint. I tend to buy a big pot of whatever is on sale, but the system3 one is pretty great. I might stick with it.

When it comes to paper, I like to use one that is affordable, thick, off-white and that can handle fine sketches as well as watercolors. The Dorée paper that i tend to use comes in many sizes and in thick pads. Every time i use something nicer and more expensive, I fuck up. Too much pressure! I bought some nice watercolor paper for a book project I want to start soon, though, hoping that it will work out anyway.

I also work with video and I use my Panasonic Lumix gh2 for filming. For obvious photographic reasons, it is not in the picture.

My work space is kinda small and it is my space for drawing, painting, video editing as well as recording music. When I decide to to the latter, it changes a bit – microphones, guitars, audio interfaces and keyboards (you can see a MicroKorg peeking out from under the desk) occupy the space. Whatever I do at that table, I have postcards, photographs and notes by people dear to me stuck on the wall next to it.

If I also want to draw during times of recording music, I mostly move my art supplies over to the dinner/coffee table. That sometimes means that I have to move dinner/coffee over to the bed. One day I am gonna have enough space for two desks. Maybe three. Hell, a room full of desks!

I would love to feature your art supplies, why you love them and the work you make with them.

It’s easy! Head on over to the submit page to upload some photos of your supplies and your work and follow the directions for what text I’m looking for (hint: mimic the bullet style that all the other posts are in, otherwise I’ll edit it).

Can’t wait to see your work!

Please share! Thanks!

heyluchie:

I received a lot of questions in my ask box and realised some come up pretty often, so I’m answering those with mini illustrations!
Today, art supplies! The next one will be about School and Comics I enjoy reading!

a rare reblog, but it’s fitting! check out this amazing artist Luchie from Brussels. heyluchie:

I received a lot of questions in my ask box and realised some come up pretty often, so I’m answering those with mini illustrations!
Today, art supplies! The next one will be about School and Comics I enjoy reading!

a rare reblog, but it’s fitting! check out this amazing artist Luchie from Brussels.

heyluchie:

I received a lot of questions in my ask box and realised some come up pretty often, so I’m answering those with mini illustrations!

Today, art supplies! The next one will be about School and Comics I enjoy reading!

a rare reblog, but it’s fitting! check out this amazing artist Luchie from Brussels.

Who: Tom Lowery - boring student, imaginary friend, and cartoonist (or something like that).Supplies:
Pigma Sensei Pens (03 and 10)
Pigma Micron Pens (01, 03, 05, 1)
Prismacolor Pens (005 to 08)
Prismacolor Double-tipped Marker (for drawing on myself)
Sharpie Pens (unlabeled, probably 05)
Uni-ball Vision Pens (normal size for writing)
Staedtler Mechanical Pencils (0.5mm and 0.7mm)
Bic 0.7mm Mechanical Pencils (for misplacing, always)
Misc. Brushes (for water colour and acrylic)
Staedtler Pencil Crayons
Crayola Twistable Crayons (a tremendous innovation)
Crayola Super Tip Markers
Pentel Water Color Tubes (sans “u” in “color”)
Panda Water Colour Tubes
Reeves Water Colour Tubes
High School Paint Trays
Staedtler Pencil Sharpener
Prismacolor “Magic Rub” Eraser
Papermate Eraser Stick (like a lightsaber that erases stuff)
American Apparel Pencil Cases
Strathmore Bristol Paper (300 and 500 series)
Moleskine Notebooks (various sizes)
Mini Hardcover Notebooks (name unknown)
Yellow Legal Paper Pads
Post-Its
Recipe Cards
Green Tea (steeped in coffee)
Rooms with no windows
Why do I love these supplies?My tools are not fancy. These are findable, affordable, and acceptable. This is important not just for budgetary reasons, but because I would be wary of wasting something that cost a lot of money. I like good stuff that is not too good.The amateur work I do is within the ability of a third grader, so I embrace my artistic limitations with pens, crayons, and paints…and coffee. That said, I will often scan and colour with Photoshop to try and get that solid fill look of Sunday newspaper strips, Tom Gauld cartoons, and Jason comics. But I do not draw with a computer because I need to touch what I am doing with my hands and get paper cuts from it (and get peanut butter on it). Computers are boring.Pens are so cool. While some of my favourite cartoons are inked with brushes, my schooling/jobbing and constant relocating (all unrelated to art, sadly) leaves me unable to dedicate long hours to cartooning with messy brushes, India ink, and paint. I need to work fast in between other tasks, and pens allow me to at least accomplish something so I can sleep at night. The good/bad thing about pens is how collectable they are, which is why I have so many. Because I use various sizes of pens, I am always curious to buy and try a new one. I am sort of like a person who owns a lot guitars or motorcycles.  For me, selecting a pen is easy: I am attracted to the ones of professional quality with the least amount of writing on them. As of late I have only been using Pigma Sensei pens because they are all black with just a little bit of gilded engraving on them. I have yet to select a specific size. Sometimes I like a slim line (like Richard Thompson’s Cul de Sac or William Steig’s cartoons), and other times I like a thick line (like Seth’s brushwork in his sketchbook stories). But I am still trying to suss out the art of the squiggly line (see Scott Campbell’s work) because the squiggle is the pulse. Anyhow, there is something comforting about a simple looking tool—be it a pen or a shovel—that reminds me of old three-chord rock songs. The Sharpie pens I have are inexpensive and a fistful come in each pack, and they are nice for wedging inside sketchbooks. When away from my desk, it is great to have a decent yet expendable pen for drawing during lectures or scribbling on napkins at restaurants. Unfortunately, the Sharpies have a weird new design on them, which makes me feel uncomfortable, so I only use them for squirrelly scrawling.Uni-ball Vision pens are nice for notes, and that is all I use them for—but just the ones with black ink. Writing in any colour other than black makes me nervous. Not even blue. Only black ink can make real words.Pencils are another story. I do not know what I am looking for, but I have not found it yet. I am curious about Blackwing pencils. For now, however, the mechanical Staedtlers seem to be fine, and the Bic pencils are great for lending people who do not return things. I am picky about erasers. The Prismacolor rubbers are almost as effective as the “undo” button. Nevertheless, it is hard to find a decent pencil sharpener that, you know, actually sharpens pencils. I hear Blackwing also makes a great pencil sharpener, but my Staedtler one is okay.Crayons and pencil crayons give everything a grade school look, and that is a special thing. I wish I could sign important documents with a purple crayon. It is not about nostalgia for me—because nostalgia is often unproductive and therefore a waste of time, which means, in the future, an overly nostalgic person will be nostalgic for nostalgia—crayons just feel instinctual. I know I pointed it out already, but the twistable feature on the new crayons is worth mentioning again…and maybe again later. The water colour paints I sometimes use represent something I am trying to reintroduce to my life. I was one of those kids who painted all the time, and then one day I stopped. Nothing I painted was any good (for example, I liked creating 2D layered landscapes—an attempt to simplify the world—on discarded pieces of plywood). It was calming, but I also lived on a lake, so it is not like I had anything better to do (fishing is stupid). Water colour is still my favourite, and I am still terrible at it, which is why I have cheap Pentel and Reeves sets (the Panda paints were a gift). These days I only paint when I am stressed out and panicking about something I cannot control. Mixing colours hypnotizes me.Regarding my choice of paper, bristol is a luxury because it does not absorb ink in that annoying blotchy way. But I will sketch on anything. The plain brown Moleskine notebooks are bland and boring, so of course they are my favourites. I do not like the custom Moleskines because they do not feel like they belong to me.There are also neat little hardcover books (with red corners) that I like because they have tiny lined pages that are good for making notes while spying—alas, they are hard to find (I can only get them in Temagami).Last of all, I keep a nice stock of recipe cards on hand for making bookmarks and little notes of appreciation. Hallmark cards make me feel like a fraud because none of them say anything I would actually say to someone. Perhaps I am sentimentally disturbed, but I prefer a hint of hopelessness in my gestures of gratitude. It is as close as I get to heartwarming.  All told, I really like those twistable crayons. Who: Tom Lowery - boring student, imaginary friend, and cartoonist (or something like that).Supplies:
Pigma Sensei Pens (03 and 10)
Pigma Micron Pens (01, 03, 05, 1)
Prismacolor Pens (005 to 08)
Prismacolor Double-tipped Marker (for drawing on myself)
Sharpie Pens (unlabeled, probably 05)
Uni-ball Vision Pens (normal size for writing)
Staedtler Mechanical Pencils (0.5mm and 0.7mm)
Bic 0.7mm Mechanical Pencils (for misplacing, always)
Misc. Brushes (for water colour and acrylic)
Staedtler Pencil Crayons
Crayola Twistable Crayons (a tremendous innovation)
Crayola Super Tip Markers
Pentel Water Color Tubes (sans “u” in “color”)
Panda Water Colour Tubes
Reeves Water Colour Tubes
High School Paint Trays
Staedtler Pencil Sharpener
Prismacolor “Magic Rub” Eraser
Papermate Eraser Stick (like a lightsaber that erases stuff)
American Apparel Pencil Cases
Strathmore Bristol Paper (300 and 500 series)
Moleskine Notebooks (various sizes)
Mini Hardcover Notebooks (name unknown)
Yellow Legal Paper Pads
Post-Its
Recipe Cards
Green Tea (steeped in coffee)
Rooms with no windows
Why do I love these supplies?My tools are not fancy. These are findable, affordable, and acceptable. This is important not just for budgetary reasons, but because I would be wary of wasting something that cost a lot of money. I like good stuff that is not too good.The amateur work I do is within the ability of a third grader, so I embrace my artistic limitations with pens, crayons, and paints…and coffee. That said, I will often scan and colour with Photoshop to try and get that solid fill look of Sunday newspaper strips, Tom Gauld cartoons, and Jason comics. But I do not draw with a computer because I need to touch what I am doing with my hands and get paper cuts from it (and get peanut butter on it). Computers are boring.Pens are so cool. While some of my favourite cartoons are inked with brushes, my schooling/jobbing and constant relocating (all unrelated to art, sadly) leaves me unable to dedicate long hours to cartooning with messy brushes, India ink, and paint. I need to work fast in between other tasks, and pens allow me to at least accomplish something so I can sleep at night. The good/bad thing about pens is how collectable they are, which is why I have so many. Because I use various sizes of pens, I am always curious to buy and try a new one. I am sort of like a person who owns a lot guitars or motorcycles.  For me, selecting a pen is easy: I am attracted to the ones of professional quality with the least amount of writing on them. As of late I have only been using Pigma Sensei pens because they are all black with just a little bit of gilded engraving on them. I have yet to select a specific size. Sometimes I like a slim line (like Richard Thompson’s Cul de Sac or William Steig’s cartoons), and other times I like a thick line (like Seth’s brushwork in his sketchbook stories). But I am still trying to suss out the art of the squiggly line (see Scott Campbell’s work) because the squiggle is the pulse. Anyhow, there is something comforting about a simple looking tool—be it a pen or a shovel—that reminds me of old three-chord rock songs. The Sharpie pens I have are inexpensive and a fistful come in each pack, and they are nice for wedging inside sketchbooks. When away from my desk, it is great to have a decent yet expendable pen for drawing during lectures or scribbling on napkins at restaurants. Unfortunately, the Sharpies have a weird new design on them, which makes me feel uncomfortable, so I only use them for squirrelly scrawling.Uni-ball Vision pens are nice for notes, and that is all I use them for—but just the ones with black ink. Writing in any colour other than black makes me nervous. Not even blue. Only black ink can make real words.Pencils are another story. I do not know what I am looking for, but I have not found it yet. I am curious about Blackwing pencils. For now, however, the mechanical Staedtlers seem to be fine, and the Bic pencils are great for lending people who do not return things. I am picky about erasers. The Prismacolor rubbers are almost as effective as the “undo” button. Nevertheless, it is hard to find a decent pencil sharpener that, you know, actually sharpens pencils. I hear Blackwing also makes a great pencil sharpener, but my Staedtler one is okay.Crayons and pencil crayons give everything a grade school look, and that is a special thing. I wish I could sign important documents with a purple crayon. It is not about nostalgia for me—because nostalgia is often unproductive and therefore a waste of time, which means, in the future, an overly nostalgic person will be nostalgic for nostalgia—crayons just feel instinctual. I know I pointed it out already, but the twistable feature on the new crayons is worth mentioning again…and maybe again later. The water colour paints I sometimes use represent something I am trying to reintroduce to my life. I was one of those kids who painted all the time, and then one day I stopped. Nothing I painted was any good (for example, I liked creating 2D layered landscapes—an attempt to simplify the world—on discarded pieces of plywood). It was calming, but I also lived on a lake, so it is not like I had anything better to do (fishing is stupid). Water colour is still my favourite, and I am still terrible at it, which is why I have cheap Pentel and Reeves sets (the Panda paints were a gift). These days I only paint when I am stressed out and panicking about something I cannot control. Mixing colours hypnotizes me.Regarding my choice of paper, bristol is a luxury because it does not absorb ink in that annoying blotchy way. But I will sketch on anything. The plain brown Moleskine notebooks are bland and boring, so of course they are my favourites. I do not like the custom Moleskines because they do not feel like they belong to me.There are also neat little hardcover books (with red corners) that I like because they have tiny lined pages that are good for making notes while spying—alas, they are hard to find (I can only get them in Temagami).Last of all, I keep a nice stock of recipe cards on hand for making bookmarks and little notes of appreciation. Hallmark cards make me feel like a fraud because none of them say anything I would actually say to someone. Perhaps I am sentimentally disturbed, but I prefer a hint of hopelessness in my gestures of gratitude. It is as close as I get to heartwarming.  All told, I really like those twistable crayons. Who: Tom Lowery - boring student, imaginary friend, and cartoonist (or something like that).Supplies:
Pigma Sensei Pens (03 and 10)
Pigma Micron Pens (01, 03, 05, 1)
Prismacolor Pens (005 to 08)
Prismacolor Double-tipped Marker (for drawing on myself)
Sharpie Pens (unlabeled, probably 05)
Uni-ball Vision Pens (normal size for writing)
Staedtler Mechanical Pencils (0.5mm and 0.7mm)
Bic 0.7mm Mechanical Pencils (for misplacing, always)
Misc. Brushes (for water colour and acrylic)
Staedtler Pencil Crayons
Crayola Twistable Crayons (a tremendous innovation)
Crayola Super Tip Markers
Pentel Water Color Tubes (sans “u” in “color”)
Panda Water Colour Tubes
Reeves Water Colour Tubes
High School Paint Trays
Staedtler Pencil Sharpener
Prismacolor “Magic Rub” Eraser
Papermate Eraser Stick (like a lightsaber that erases stuff)
American Apparel Pencil Cases
Strathmore Bristol Paper (300 and 500 series)
Moleskine Notebooks (various sizes)
Mini Hardcover Notebooks (name unknown)
Yellow Legal Paper Pads
Post-Its
Recipe Cards
Green Tea (steeped in coffee)
Rooms with no windows
Why do I love these supplies?My tools are not fancy. These are findable, affordable, and acceptable. This is important not just for budgetary reasons, but because I would be wary of wasting something that cost a lot of money. I like good stuff that is not too good.The amateur work I do is within the ability of a third grader, so I embrace my artistic limitations with pens, crayons, and paints…and coffee. That said, I will often scan and colour with Photoshop to try and get that solid fill look of Sunday newspaper strips, Tom Gauld cartoons, and Jason comics. But I do not draw with a computer because I need to touch what I am doing with my hands and get paper cuts from it (and get peanut butter on it). Computers are boring.Pens are so cool. While some of my favourite cartoons are inked with brushes, my schooling/jobbing and constant relocating (all unrelated to art, sadly) leaves me unable to dedicate long hours to cartooning with messy brushes, India ink, and paint. I need to work fast in between other tasks, and pens allow me to at least accomplish something so I can sleep at night. The good/bad thing about pens is how collectable they are, which is why I have so many. Because I use various sizes of pens, I am always curious to buy and try a new one. I am sort of like a person who owns a lot guitars or motorcycles.  For me, selecting a pen is easy: I am attracted to the ones of professional quality with the least amount of writing on them. As of late I have only been using Pigma Sensei pens because they are all black with just a little bit of gilded engraving on them. I have yet to select a specific size. Sometimes I like a slim line (like Richard Thompson’s Cul de Sac or William Steig’s cartoons), and other times I like a thick line (like Seth’s brushwork in his sketchbook stories). But I am still trying to suss out the art of the squiggly line (see Scott Campbell’s work) because the squiggle is the pulse. Anyhow, there is something comforting about a simple looking tool—be it a pen or a shovel—that reminds me of old three-chord rock songs. The Sharpie pens I have are inexpensive and a fistful come in each pack, and they are nice for wedging inside sketchbooks. When away from my desk, it is great to have a decent yet expendable pen for drawing during lectures or scribbling on napkins at restaurants. Unfortunately, the Sharpies have a weird new design on them, which makes me feel uncomfortable, so I only use them for squirrelly scrawling.Uni-ball Vision pens are nice for notes, and that is all I use them for—but just the ones with black ink. Writing in any colour other than black makes me nervous. Not even blue. Only black ink can make real words.Pencils are another story. I do not know what I am looking for, but I have not found it yet. I am curious about Blackwing pencils. For now, however, the mechanical Staedtlers seem to be fine, and the Bic pencils are great for lending people who do not return things. I am picky about erasers. The Prismacolor rubbers are almost as effective as the “undo” button. Nevertheless, it is hard to find a decent pencil sharpener that, you know, actually sharpens pencils. I hear Blackwing also makes a great pencil sharpener, but my Staedtler one is okay.Crayons and pencil crayons give everything a grade school look, and that is a special thing. I wish I could sign important documents with a purple crayon. It is not about nostalgia for me—because nostalgia is often unproductive and therefore a waste of time, which means, in the future, an overly nostalgic person will be nostalgic for nostalgia—crayons just feel instinctual. I know I pointed it out already, but the twistable feature on the new crayons is worth mentioning again…and maybe again later. The water colour paints I sometimes use represent something I am trying to reintroduce to my life. I was one of those kids who painted all the time, and then one day I stopped. Nothing I painted was any good (for example, I liked creating 2D layered landscapes—an attempt to simplify the world—on discarded pieces of plywood). It was calming, but I also lived on a lake, so it is not like I had anything better to do (fishing is stupid). Water colour is still my favourite, and I am still terrible at it, which is why I have cheap Pentel and Reeves sets (the Panda paints were a gift). These days I only paint when I am stressed out and panicking about something I cannot control. Mixing colours hypnotizes me.Regarding my choice of paper, bristol is a luxury because it does not absorb ink in that annoying blotchy way. But I will sketch on anything. The plain brown Moleskine notebooks are bland and boring, so of course they are my favourites. I do not like the custom Moleskines because they do not feel like they belong to me.There are also neat little hardcover books (with red corners) that I like because they have tiny lined pages that are good for making notes while spying—alas, they are hard to find (I can only get them in Temagami).Last of all, I keep a nice stock of recipe cards on hand for making bookmarks and little notes of appreciation. Hallmark cards make me feel like a fraud because none of them say anything I would actually say to someone. Perhaps I am sentimentally disturbed, but I prefer a hint of hopelessness in my gestures of gratitude. It is as close as I get to heartwarming.  All told, I really like those twistable crayons. Who: Tom Lowery - boring student, imaginary friend, and cartoonist (or something like that).Supplies:
Pigma Sensei Pens (03 and 10)
Pigma Micron Pens (01, 03, 05, 1)
Prismacolor Pens (005 to 08)
Prismacolor Double-tipped Marker (for drawing on myself)
Sharpie Pens (unlabeled, probably 05)
Uni-ball Vision Pens (normal size for writing)
Staedtler Mechanical Pencils (0.5mm and 0.7mm)
Bic 0.7mm Mechanical Pencils (for misplacing, always)
Misc. Brushes (for water colour and acrylic)
Staedtler Pencil Crayons
Crayola Twistable Crayons (a tremendous innovation)
Crayola Super Tip Markers
Pentel Water Color Tubes (sans “u” in “color”)
Panda Water Colour Tubes
Reeves Water Colour Tubes
High School Paint Trays
Staedtler Pencil Sharpener
Prismacolor “Magic Rub” Eraser
Papermate Eraser Stick (like a lightsaber that erases stuff)
American Apparel Pencil Cases
Strathmore Bristol Paper (300 and 500 series)
Moleskine Notebooks (various sizes)
Mini Hardcover Notebooks (name unknown)
Yellow Legal Paper Pads
Post-Its
Recipe Cards
Green Tea (steeped in coffee)
Rooms with no windows
Why do I love these supplies?My tools are not fancy. These are findable, affordable, and acceptable. This is important not just for budgetary reasons, but because I would be wary of wasting something that cost a lot of money. I like good stuff that is not too good.The amateur work I do is within the ability of a third grader, so I embrace my artistic limitations with pens, crayons, and paints…and coffee. That said, I will often scan and colour with Photoshop to try and get that solid fill look of Sunday newspaper strips, Tom Gauld cartoons, and Jason comics. But I do not draw with a computer because I need to touch what I am doing with my hands and get paper cuts from it (and get peanut butter on it). Computers are boring.Pens are so cool. While some of my favourite cartoons are inked with brushes, my schooling/jobbing and constant relocating (all unrelated to art, sadly) leaves me unable to dedicate long hours to cartooning with messy brushes, India ink, and paint. I need to work fast in between other tasks, and pens allow me to at least accomplish something so I can sleep at night. The good/bad thing about pens is how collectable they are, which is why I have so many. Because I use various sizes of pens, I am always curious to buy and try a new one. I am sort of like a person who owns a lot guitars or motorcycles.  For me, selecting a pen is easy: I am attracted to the ones of professional quality with the least amount of writing on them. As of late I have only been using Pigma Sensei pens because they are all black with just a little bit of gilded engraving on them. I have yet to select a specific size. Sometimes I like a slim line (like Richard Thompson’s Cul de Sac or William Steig’s cartoons), and other times I like a thick line (like Seth’s brushwork in his sketchbook stories). But I am still trying to suss out the art of the squiggly line (see Scott Campbell’s work) because the squiggle is the pulse. Anyhow, there is something comforting about a simple looking tool—be it a pen or a shovel—that reminds me of old three-chord rock songs. The Sharpie pens I have are inexpensive and a fistful come in each pack, and they are nice for wedging inside sketchbooks. When away from my desk, it is great to have a decent yet expendable pen for drawing during lectures or scribbling on napkins at restaurants. Unfortunately, the Sharpies have a weird new design on them, which makes me feel uncomfortable, so I only use them for squirrelly scrawling.Uni-ball Vision pens are nice for notes, and that is all I use them for—but just the ones with black ink. Writing in any colour other than black makes me nervous. Not even blue. Only black ink can make real words.Pencils are another story. I do not know what I am looking for, but I have not found it yet. I am curious about Blackwing pencils. For now, however, the mechanical Staedtlers seem to be fine, and the Bic pencils are great for lending people who do not return things. I am picky about erasers. The Prismacolor rubbers are almost as effective as the “undo” button. Nevertheless, it is hard to find a decent pencil sharpener that, you know, actually sharpens pencils. I hear Blackwing also makes a great pencil sharpener, but my Staedtler one is okay.Crayons and pencil crayons give everything a grade school look, and that is a special thing. I wish I could sign important documents with a purple crayon. It is not about nostalgia for me—because nostalgia is often unproductive and therefore a waste of time, which means, in the future, an overly nostalgic person will be nostalgic for nostalgia—crayons just feel instinctual. I know I pointed it out already, but the twistable feature on the new crayons is worth mentioning again…and maybe again later. The water colour paints I sometimes use represent something I am trying to reintroduce to my life. I was one of those kids who painted all the time, and then one day I stopped. Nothing I painted was any good (for example, I liked creating 2D layered landscapes—an attempt to simplify the world—on discarded pieces of plywood). It was calming, but I also lived on a lake, so it is not like I had anything better to do (fishing is stupid). Water colour is still my favourite, and I am still terrible at it, which is why I have cheap Pentel and Reeves sets (the Panda paints were a gift). These days I only paint when I am stressed out and panicking about something I cannot control. Mixing colours hypnotizes me.Regarding my choice of paper, bristol is a luxury because it does not absorb ink in that annoying blotchy way. But I will sketch on anything. The plain brown Moleskine notebooks are bland and boring, so of course they are my favourites. I do not like the custom Moleskines because they do not feel like they belong to me.There are also neat little hardcover books (with red corners) that I like because they have tiny lined pages that are good for making notes while spying—alas, they are hard to find (I can only get them in Temagami).Last of all, I keep a nice stock of recipe cards on hand for making bookmarks and little notes of appreciation. Hallmark cards make me feel like a fraud because none of them say anything I would actually say to someone. Perhaps I am sentimentally disturbed, but I prefer a hint of hopelessness in my gestures of gratitude. It is as close as I get to heartwarming.  All told, I really like those twistable crayons. Who: Tom Lowery - boring student, imaginary friend, and cartoonist (or something like that).Supplies:
Pigma Sensei Pens (03 and 10)
Pigma Micron Pens (01, 03, 05, 1)
Prismacolor Pens (005 to 08)
Prismacolor Double-tipped Marker (for drawing on myself)
Sharpie Pens (unlabeled, probably 05)
Uni-ball Vision Pens (normal size for writing)
Staedtler Mechanical Pencils (0.5mm and 0.7mm)
Bic 0.7mm Mechanical Pencils (for misplacing, always)
Misc. Brushes (for water colour and acrylic)
Staedtler Pencil Crayons
Crayola Twistable Crayons (a tremendous innovation)
Crayola Super Tip Markers
Pentel Water Color Tubes (sans “u” in “color”)
Panda Water Colour Tubes
Reeves Water Colour Tubes
High School Paint Trays
Staedtler Pencil Sharpener
Prismacolor “Magic Rub” Eraser
Papermate Eraser Stick (like a lightsaber that erases stuff)
American Apparel Pencil Cases
Strathmore Bristol Paper (300 and 500 series)
Moleskine Notebooks (various sizes)
Mini Hardcover Notebooks (name unknown)
Yellow Legal Paper Pads
Post-Its
Recipe Cards
Green Tea (steeped in coffee)
Rooms with no windows
Why do I love these supplies?My tools are not fancy. These are findable, affordable, and acceptable. This is important not just for budgetary reasons, but because I would be wary of wasting something that cost a lot of money. I like good stuff that is not too good.The amateur work I do is within the ability of a third grader, so I embrace my artistic limitations with pens, crayons, and paints…and coffee. That said, I will often scan and colour with Photoshop to try and get that solid fill look of Sunday newspaper strips, Tom Gauld cartoons, and Jason comics. But I do not draw with a computer because I need to touch what I am doing with my hands and get paper cuts from it (and get peanut butter on it). Computers are boring.Pens are so cool. While some of my favourite cartoons are inked with brushes, my schooling/jobbing and constant relocating (all unrelated to art, sadly) leaves me unable to dedicate long hours to cartooning with messy brushes, India ink, and paint. I need to work fast in between other tasks, and pens allow me to at least accomplish something so I can sleep at night. The good/bad thing about pens is how collectable they are, which is why I have so many. Because I use various sizes of pens, I am always curious to buy and try a new one. I am sort of like a person who owns a lot guitars or motorcycles.  For me, selecting a pen is easy: I am attracted to the ones of professional quality with the least amount of writing on them. As of late I have only been using Pigma Sensei pens because they are all black with just a little bit of gilded engraving on them. I have yet to select a specific size. Sometimes I like a slim line (like Richard Thompson’s Cul de Sac or William Steig’s cartoons), and other times I like a thick line (like Seth’s brushwork in his sketchbook stories). But I am still trying to suss out the art of the squiggly line (see Scott Campbell’s work) because the squiggle is the pulse. Anyhow, there is something comforting about a simple looking tool—be it a pen or a shovel—that reminds me of old three-chord rock songs. The Sharpie pens I have are inexpensive and a fistful come in each pack, and they are nice for wedging inside sketchbooks. When away from my desk, it is great to have a decent yet expendable pen for drawing during lectures or scribbling on napkins at restaurants. Unfortunately, the Sharpies have a weird new design on them, which makes me feel uncomfortable, so I only use them for squirrelly scrawling.Uni-ball Vision pens are nice for notes, and that is all I use them for—but just the ones with black ink. Writing in any colour other than black makes me nervous. Not even blue. Only black ink can make real words.Pencils are another story. I do not know what I am looking for, but I have not found it yet. I am curious about Blackwing pencils. For now, however, the mechanical Staedtlers seem to be fine, and the Bic pencils are great for lending people who do not return things. I am picky about erasers. The Prismacolor rubbers are almost as effective as the “undo” button. Nevertheless, it is hard to find a decent pencil sharpener that, you know, actually sharpens pencils. I hear Blackwing also makes a great pencil sharpener, but my Staedtler one is okay.Crayons and pencil crayons give everything a grade school look, and that is a special thing. I wish I could sign important documents with a purple crayon. It is not about nostalgia for me—because nostalgia is often unproductive and therefore a waste of time, which means, in the future, an overly nostalgic person will be nostalgic for nostalgia—crayons just feel instinctual. I know I pointed it out already, but the twistable feature on the new crayons is worth mentioning again…and maybe again later. The water colour paints I sometimes use represent something I am trying to reintroduce to my life. I was one of those kids who painted all the time, and then one day I stopped. Nothing I painted was any good (for example, I liked creating 2D layered landscapes—an attempt to simplify the world—on discarded pieces of plywood). It was calming, but I also lived on a lake, so it is not like I had anything better to do (fishing is stupid). Water colour is still my favourite, and I am still terrible at it, which is why I have cheap Pentel and Reeves sets (the Panda paints were a gift). These days I only paint when I am stressed out and panicking about something I cannot control. Mixing colours hypnotizes me.Regarding my choice of paper, bristol is a luxury because it does not absorb ink in that annoying blotchy way. But I will sketch on anything. The plain brown Moleskine notebooks are bland and boring, so of course they are my favourites. I do not like the custom Moleskines because they do not feel like they belong to me.There are also neat little hardcover books (with red corners) that I like because they have tiny lined pages that are good for making notes while spying—alas, they are hard to find (I can only get them in Temagami).Last of all, I keep a nice stock of recipe cards on hand for making bookmarks and little notes of appreciation. Hallmark cards make me feel like a fraud because none of them say anything I would actually say to someone. Perhaps I am sentimentally disturbed, but I prefer a hint of hopelessness in my gestures of gratitude. It is as close as I get to heartwarming.  All told, I really like those twistable crayons.

Who: Tom Lowery - boring student, imaginary friend, and cartoonist (or something like that).

Supplies:

  • Pigma Sensei Pens (03 and 10)
  • Pigma Micron Pens (01, 03, 05, 1)
  • Prismacolor Pens (005 to 08)
  • Prismacolor Double-tipped Marker (for drawing on myself)
  • Sharpie Pens (unlabeled, probably 05)
  • Uni-ball Vision Pens (normal size for writing)
  • Staedtler Mechanical Pencils (0.5mm and 0.7mm)
  • Bic 0.7mm Mechanical Pencils (for misplacing, always)
  • Misc. Brushes (for water colour and acrylic)
  • Staedtler Pencil Crayons
  • Crayola Twistable Crayons (a tremendous innovation)
  • Crayola Super Tip Markers
  • Pentel Water Color Tubes (sans “u” in “color”)
  • Panda Water Colour Tubes
  • Reeves Water Colour Tubes
  • High School Paint Trays
  • Staedtler Pencil Sharpener
  • Prismacolor “Magic Rub” Eraser
  • Papermate Eraser Stick (like a lightsaber that erases stuff)
  • American Apparel Pencil Cases
  • Strathmore Bristol Paper (300 and 500 series)
  • Moleskine Notebooks (various sizes)
  • Mini Hardcover Notebooks (name unknown)
  • Yellow Legal Paper Pads
  • Post-Its
  • Recipe Cards
  • Green Tea (steeped in coffee)
  • Rooms with no windows

Why do I love these supplies?

My tools are not fancy. These are findable, affordable, and acceptable. This is important not just for budgetary reasons, but because I would be wary of wasting something that cost a lot of money. I like good stuff that is not too good.

The amateur work I do is within the ability of a third grader, so I embrace my artistic limitations with pens, crayons, and paints…and coffee. That said, I will often scan and colour with Photoshop to try and get that solid fill look of Sunday newspaper strips, Tom Gauld cartoons, and Jason comics. But I do not draw with a computer because I need to touch what I am doing with my hands and get paper cuts from it (and get peanut butter on it). Computers are boring.

Pens are so cool. While some of my favourite cartoons are inked with brushes, my schooling/jobbing and constant relocating (all unrelated to art, sadly) leaves me unable to dedicate long hours to cartooning with messy brushes, India ink, and paint. I need to work fast in between other tasks, and pens allow me to at least accomplish something so I can sleep at night. The good/bad thing about pens is how collectable they are, which is why I have so many. Because I use various sizes of pens, I am always curious to buy and try a new one. I am sort of like a person who owns a lot guitars or motorcycles.  

For me, selecting a pen is easy: I am attracted to the ones of professional quality with the least amount of writing on them. As of late I have only been using Pigma Sensei pens because they are all black with just a little bit of gilded engraving on them. I have yet to select a specific size. Sometimes I like a slim line (like Richard Thompson’s Cul de Sac or William Steig’s cartoons), and other times I like a thick line (like Seth’s brushwork in his sketchbook stories). But I am still trying to suss out the art of the squiggly line (see Scott Campbell’s work) because the squiggle is the pulse. Anyhow, there is something comforting about a simple looking tool—be it a pen or a shovel—that reminds me of old three-chord rock songs.

The Sharpie pens I have are inexpensive and a fistful come in each pack, and they are nice for wedging inside sketchbooks. When away from my desk, it is great to have a decent yet expendable pen for drawing during lectures or scribbling on napkins at restaurants. Unfortunately, the Sharpies have a weird new design on them, which makes me feel uncomfortable, so I only use them for squirrelly scrawling.

Uni-ball Vision pens are nice for notes, and that is all I use them for—but just the ones with black ink. Writing in any colour other than black makes me nervous. Not even blue. Only black ink can make real words.

Pencils are another story. I do not know what I am looking for, but I have not found it yet. I am curious about Blackwing pencils. For now, however, the mechanical Staedtlers seem to be fine, and the Bic pencils are great for lending people who do not return things. I am picky about erasers. The Prismacolor rubbers are almost as effective as the “undo” button. Nevertheless, it is hard to find a decent pencil sharpener that, you know, actually sharpens pencils. I hear Blackwing also makes a great pencil sharpener, but my Staedtler one is okay.

Crayons and pencil crayons give everything a grade school look, and that is a special thing. I wish I could sign important documents with a purple crayon. It is not about nostalgia for me—because nostalgia is often unproductive and therefore a waste of time, which means, in the future, an overly nostalgic person will be nostalgic for nostalgia—crayons just feel instinctual. I know I pointed it out already, but the twistable feature on the new crayons is worth mentioning again…and maybe again later.

The water colour paints I sometimes use represent something I am trying to reintroduce to my life. I was one of those kids who painted all the time, and then one day I stopped. Nothing I painted was any good (for example, I liked creating 2D layered landscapes—an attempt to simplify the world—on discarded pieces of plywood). It was calming, but I also lived on a lake, so it is not like I had anything better to do (fishing is stupid). Water colour is still my favourite, and I am still terrible at it, which is why I have cheap Pentel and Reeves sets (the Panda paints were a gift). These days I only paint when I am stressed out and panicking about something I cannot control. Mixing colours hypnotizes me.

Regarding my choice of paper, bristol is a luxury because it does not absorb ink in that annoying blotchy way. But I will sketch on anything. The plain brown Moleskine notebooks are bland and boring, so of course they are my favourites. I do not like the custom Moleskines because they do not feel like they belong to me.There are also neat little hardcover books (with red corners) that I like because they have tiny lined pages that are good for making notes while spying—alas, they are hard to find (I can only get them in Temagami).

Last of all, I keep a nice stock of recipe cards on hand for making bookmarks and little notes of appreciation. Hallmark cards make me feel like a fraud because none of them say anything I would actually say to someone. Perhaps I am sentimentally disturbed, but I prefer a hint of hopelessness in my gestures of gratitude. It is as close as I get to heartwarming.  

All told, I really like those twistable crayons.

Who:

Adie Margineanu, Graphic Designer & Medical Illustrator

Supplies:

  • Raffine Artist’s Sketching Pencils
  • Raffine Pencil case lids and yogurt container lids as mixing palettes 
  • Curry’s Line Brushes
  • Sakura Pigma Microns (0.5)
  • Reeves watercolors
  • Premiere Watercolor pads (cold-press paper)
  • Adobe Illustrator CS6 (on iMac)
  • OsiriX (on iMac)

Why I love these supplies:

Although I’ve been drawing since I was little, my creative outlet has been coupled with digital experimentation from the time I was 13 so I thought it was fitting to include both traditional and digital media that I currently use most.

I stopped being a student less than a year ago so I am used to the mid to low priced fine art materials. The Raffine pencils are more modestly priced than the beloved Staedlers so I began using them in high school and stuck to them since. I like that the metal lids can be used as makeshift water-colour palettes.

Brushes are expensive and although I splurged a few times (Winsor & Newton) I find that I really prefer the Curry ones. They hold paint nicely and blend well. I started using the Sakura Pigma Microns during my master’s degree in Medical Illustration - our professors swear by them and I do really like them. Inking is probably my favourite part of creating an illustration so it is important for me to have really reliable, consistent fine liners. I have a thing for line weight. Unfortunately, and I won’t point fingers, but they constantly disappear in my apartment, kind of like bobby pins.

I use pretty cheap watercolors (Reeves) because I like to paint in a relatively loose and expressive way; I only bother with detail at the inking stage so I figure the colour is really just a bit of candy at the end and anyway, I think having brushes you’re really comfortable with is way more important than having great paint.

I spent a long time in front of computers during my master’s degree and the program I’ve loved since I was 13 is still my favourite - Adobe Illustrator. I like creating very clean crisp digital art, so the Besier Curve and the beauty of line widths in Illustrator have always been essential for me.

I work with photographic imagery and now that I have some experience with medical imaging software like OsiriX, I can combine my love of very graphic/rigid illustration and anatomy. I’ve started using the imaging sets that come with Osirix (MRIs or CT scans that can be put together to form a 3D rotating animation) to isolate a still image of an organ system or other anatomical system at a specific angle. I situate these (as anatomically correctly as I can) within illustrations of women. I really like the juxtaposition of these beautiful women with organs from a predominantly geriatric population and knowing that I am the only person that has seen what the original organ-owner looked like.

The Continuist (apparently now my zine rival, grrrrs! <3) wants you to submit! I think you should too.

Who: Clara Bee Lavery, Toronto-bred-and-based illustrator/artist, zinester, weirdo-about-town.Supplies:*Faber-Castell pens - usually XS or S*Prismacolor pens, ranging from 01-05*Windsor-Newton and Reeves Gouache paints*Yoghurt lids (the best palettes that ever were!)*coffee (nice mid-tone browns!)*paint brushes, as cheap as they come*mod podge*ecojot 5x7 sketchbooks *Daler-Rowney 135&#160;lb HeavyWeight paper pads         
Why do I love these supplies?I am extremely privileged to come from a family who values and appreciates art-making. My dad does really beautiful, strange paintings and drawings of wildlife and rural settings, my mom makes bizarrely lovely puppets and hats, &amp; my sister is a comic artist who makes these amazing sequential inkwashes. I grew up in a supportive and creative environment, and this has extended to my adult life: my parents still send me care packages with art supplies every so often, and I really can&#8217;t overstate how crucial that is to my practice. Like many artists, I am low-income, and a couple of good pens in the mail make a world of difference. Thanks, parents!
I just discovered Prismacolor pens after years of loyalty to only Faber-Castell. My ex-boyfriend gave me a beautiful set of &#8216;em when I got married last summer, and I&#8217;m hooked!As for paper, I&#8217;ve been buying the exact same sketchbook for years. It&#8217;s a nice, cheap option and I like the plain covers for drawing on. It&#8217;s not the most ideal paper for painting on, but I&#8217;m not a fancy kind of gal - I just use Photoshop to clean up the wrinkles. If I&#8217;m illustrating for a client, though, I use a sturdier option like 135&#160;lb cold-pressed bristol board - I usually only need two or three big pads of those a year. The nicest thing for art-making that I own is my beautiful drafting table, which my best friends and husband went in on together for my birthday last year. When I&#8217;m working on a piece, I keep the upper right hand corner covered in magazine clippings, postcards, stickers - anything that matches the aesthetic I&#8217;m going for - as inspiration and to focus my practice.As you can see, I am very lucky to have others looking out for me and encouraging my practice. Though I live in a society that doesn&#8217;t value or pay artists, I am so fortunate to be part of a community that actively fosters my work. I try to do my best to put that positive energy back into the world with my drawings, and through supporting other artists as they support me &lt;3 Who: Clara Bee Lavery, Toronto-bred-and-based illustrator/artist, zinester, weirdo-about-town.Supplies:*Faber-Castell pens - usually XS or S*Prismacolor pens, ranging from 01-05*Windsor-Newton and Reeves Gouache paints*Yoghurt lids (the best palettes that ever were!)*coffee (nice mid-tone browns!)*paint brushes, as cheap as they come*mod podge*ecojot 5x7 sketchbooks *Daler-Rowney 135&#160;lb HeavyWeight paper pads         
Why do I love these supplies?I am extremely privileged to come from a family who values and appreciates art-making. My dad does really beautiful, strange paintings and drawings of wildlife and rural settings, my mom makes bizarrely lovely puppets and hats, &amp; my sister is a comic artist who makes these amazing sequential inkwashes. I grew up in a supportive and creative environment, and this has extended to my adult life: my parents still send me care packages with art supplies every so often, and I really can&#8217;t overstate how crucial that is to my practice. Like many artists, I am low-income, and a couple of good pens in the mail make a world of difference. Thanks, parents!
I just discovered Prismacolor pens after years of loyalty to only Faber-Castell. My ex-boyfriend gave me a beautiful set of &#8216;em when I got married last summer, and I&#8217;m hooked!As for paper, I&#8217;ve been buying the exact same sketchbook for years. It&#8217;s a nice, cheap option and I like the plain covers for drawing on. It&#8217;s not the most ideal paper for painting on, but I&#8217;m not a fancy kind of gal - I just use Photoshop to clean up the wrinkles. If I&#8217;m illustrating for a client, though, I use a sturdier option like 135&#160;lb cold-pressed bristol board - I usually only need two or three big pads of those a year. The nicest thing for art-making that I own is my beautiful drafting table, which my best friends and husband went in on together for my birthday last year. When I&#8217;m working on a piece, I keep the upper right hand corner covered in magazine clippings, postcards, stickers - anything that matches the aesthetic I&#8217;m going for - as inspiration and to focus my practice.As you can see, I am very lucky to have others looking out for me and encouraging my practice. Though I live in a society that doesn&#8217;t value or pay artists, I am so fortunate to be part of a community that actively fosters my work. I try to do my best to put that positive energy back into the world with my drawings, and through supporting other artists as they support me &lt;3 Who: Clara Bee Lavery, Toronto-bred-and-based illustrator/artist, zinester, weirdo-about-town.Supplies:*Faber-Castell pens - usually XS or S*Prismacolor pens, ranging from 01-05*Windsor-Newton and Reeves Gouache paints*Yoghurt lids (the best palettes that ever were!)*coffee (nice mid-tone browns!)*paint brushes, as cheap as they come*mod podge*ecojot 5x7 sketchbooks *Daler-Rowney 135&#160;lb HeavyWeight paper pads         
Why do I love these supplies?I am extremely privileged to come from a family who values and appreciates art-making. My dad does really beautiful, strange paintings and drawings of wildlife and rural settings, my mom makes bizarrely lovely puppets and hats, &amp; my sister is a comic artist who makes these amazing sequential inkwashes. I grew up in a supportive and creative environment, and this has extended to my adult life: my parents still send me care packages with art supplies every so often, and I really can&#8217;t overstate how crucial that is to my practice. Like many artists, I am low-income, and a couple of good pens in the mail make a world of difference. Thanks, parents!
I just discovered Prismacolor pens after years of loyalty to only Faber-Castell. My ex-boyfriend gave me a beautiful set of &#8216;em when I got married last summer, and I&#8217;m hooked!As for paper, I&#8217;ve been buying the exact same sketchbook for years. It&#8217;s a nice, cheap option and I like the plain covers for drawing on. It&#8217;s not the most ideal paper for painting on, but I&#8217;m not a fancy kind of gal - I just use Photoshop to clean up the wrinkles. If I&#8217;m illustrating for a client, though, I use a sturdier option like 135&#160;lb cold-pressed bristol board - I usually only need two or three big pads of those a year. The nicest thing for art-making that I own is my beautiful drafting table, which my best friends and husband went in on together for my birthday last year. When I&#8217;m working on a piece, I keep the upper right hand corner covered in magazine clippings, postcards, stickers - anything that matches the aesthetic I&#8217;m going for - as inspiration and to focus my practice.As you can see, I am very lucky to have others looking out for me and encouraging my practice. Though I live in a society that doesn&#8217;t value or pay artists, I am so fortunate to be part of a community that actively fosters my work. I try to do my best to put that positive energy back into the world with my drawings, and through supporting other artists as they support me &lt;3 Who: Clara Bee Lavery, Toronto-bred-and-based illustrator/artist, zinester, weirdo-about-town.Supplies:*Faber-Castell pens - usually XS or S*Prismacolor pens, ranging from 01-05*Windsor-Newton and Reeves Gouache paints*Yoghurt lids (the best palettes that ever were!)*coffee (nice mid-tone browns!)*paint brushes, as cheap as they come*mod podge*ecojot 5x7 sketchbooks *Daler-Rowney 135&#160;lb HeavyWeight paper pads         
Why do I love these supplies?I am extremely privileged to come from a family who values and appreciates art-making. My dad does really beautiful, strange paintings and drawings of wildlife and rural settings, my mom makes bizarrely lovely puppets and hats, &amp; my sister is a comic artist who makes these amazing sequential inkwashes. I grew up in a supportive and creative environment, and this has extended to my adult life: my parents still send me care packages with art supplies every so often, and I really can&#8217;t overstate how crucial that is to my practice. Like many artists, I am low-income, and a couple of good pens in the mail make a world of difference. Thanks, parents!
I just discovered Prismacolor pens after years of loyalty to only Faber-Castell. My ex-boyfriend gave me a beautiful set of &#8216;em when I got married last summer, and I&#8217;m hooked!As for paper, I&#8217;ve been buying the exact same sketchbook for years. It&#8217;s a nice, cheap option and I like the plain covers for drawing on. It&#8217;s not the most ideal paper for painting on, but I&#8217;m not a fancy kind of gal - I just use Photoshop to clean up the wrinkles. If I&#8217;m illustrating for a client, though, I use a sturdier option like 135&#160;lb cold-pressed bristol board - I usually only need two or three big pads of those a year. The nicest thing for art-making that I own is my beautiful drafting table, which my best friends and husband went in on together for my birthday last year. When I&#8217;m working on a piece, I keep the upper right hand corner covered in magazine clippings, postcards, stickers - anything that matches the aesthetic I&#8217;m going for - as inspiration and to focus my practice.As you can see, I am very lucky to have others looking out for me and encouraging my practice. Though I live in a society that doesn&#8217;t value or pay artists, I am so fortunate to be part of a community that actively fosters my work. I try to do my best to put that positive energy back into the world with my drawings, and through supporting other artists as they support me &lt;3 Who: Clara Bee Lavery, Toronto-bred-and-based illustrator/artist, zinester, weirdo-about-town.Supplies:*Faber-Castell pens - usually XS or S*Prismacolor pens, ranging from 01-05*Windsor-Newton and Reeves Gouache paints*Yoghurt lids (the best palettes that ever were!)*coffee (nice mid-tone browns!)*paint brushes, as cheap as they come*mod podge*ecojot 5x7 sketchbooks *Daler-Rowney 135&#160;lb HeavyWeight paper pads         
Why do I love these supplies?I am extremely privileged to come from a family who values and appreciates art-making. My dad does really beautiful, strange paintings and drawings of wildlife and rural settings, my mom makes bizarrely lovely puppets and hats, &amp; my sister is a comic artist who makes these amazing sequential inkwashes. I grew up in a supportive and creative environment, and this has extended to my adult life: my parents still send me care packages with art supplies every so often, and I really can&#8217;t overstate how crucial that is to my practice. Like many artists, I am low-income, and a couple of good pens in the mail make a world of difference. Thanks, parents!
I just discovered Prismacolor pens after years of loyalty to only Faber-Castell. My ex-boyfriend gave me a beautiful set of &#8216;em when I got married last summer, and I&#8217;m hooked!As for paper, I&#8217;ve been buying the exact same sketchbook for years. It&#8217;s a nice, cheap option and I like the plain covers for drawing on. It&#8217;s not the most ideal paper for painting on, but I&#8217;m not a fancy kind of gal - I just use Photoshop to clean up the wrinkles. If I&#8217;m illustrating for a client, though, I use a sturdier option like 135&#160;lb cold-pressed bristol board - I usually only need two or three big pads of those a year. The nicest thing for art-making that I own is my beautiful drafting table, which my best friends and husband went in on together for my birthday last year. When I&#8217;m working on a piece, I keep the upper right hand corner covered in magazine clippings, postcards, stickers - anything that matches the aesthetic I&#8217;m going for - as inspiration and to focus my practice.As you can see, I am very lucky to have others looking out for me and encouraging my practice. Though I live in a society that doesn&#8217;t value or pay artists, I am so fortunate to be part of a community that actively fosters my work. I try to do my best to put that positive energy back into the world with my drawings, and through supporting other artists as they support me &lt;3 Who: Clara Bee Lavery, Toronto-bred-and-based illustrator/artist, zinester, weirdo-about-town.Supplies:*Faber-Castell pens - usually XS or S*Prismacolor pens, ranging from 01-05*Windsor-Newton and Reeves Gouache paints*Yoghurt lids (the best palettes that ever were!)*coffee (nice mid-tone browns!)*paint brushes, as cheap as they come*mod podge*ecojot 5x7 sketchbooks *Daler-Rowney 135&#160;lb HeavyWeight paper pads         
Why do I love these supplies?I am extremely privileged to come from a family who values and appreciates art-making. My dad does really beautiful, strange paintings and drawings of wildlife and rural settings, my mom makes bizarrely lovely puppets and hats, &amp; my sister is a comic artist who makes these amazing sequential inkwashes. I grew up in a supportive and creative environment, and this has extended to my adult life: my parents still send me care packages with art supplies every so often, and I really can&#8217;t overstate how crucial that is to my practice. Like many artists, I am low-income, and a couple of good pens in the mail make a world of difference. Thanks, parents!
I just discovered Prismacolor pens after years of loyalty to only Faber-Castell. My ex-boyfriend gave me a beautiful set of &#8216;em when I got married last summer, and I&#8217;m hooked!As for paper, I&#8217;ve been buying the exact same sketchbook for years. It&#8217;s a nice, cheap option and I like the plain covers for drawing on. It&#8217;s not the most ideal paper for painting on, but I&#8217;m not a fancy kind of gal - I just use Photoshop to clean up the wrinkles. If I&#8217;m illustrating for a client, though, I use a sturdier option like 135&#160;lb cold-pressed bristol board - I usually only need two or three big pads of those a year. The nicest thing for art-making that I own is my beautiful drafting table, which my best friends and husband went in on together for my birthday last year. When I&#8217;m working on a piece, I keep the upper right hand corner covered in magazine clippings, postcards, stickers - anything that matches the aesthetic I&#8217;m going for - as inspiration and to focus my practice.As you can see, I am very lucky to have others looking out for me and encouraging my practice. Though I live in a society that doesn&#8217;t value or pay artists, I am so fortunate to be part of a community that actively fosters my work. I try to do my best to put that positive energy back into the world with my drawings, and through supporting other artists as they support me &lt;3

Who: Clara Bee Lavery, Toronto-bred-and-based illustrator/artist, zinester, weirdo-about-town.

Supplies:
*Faber-Castell pens - usually XS or S
*Prismacolor pens, ranging from 01-05
*Windsor-Newton and Reeves Gouache paints
*Yoghurt lids (the best palettes that ever were!)
*coffee (nice mid-tone browns!)
*paint brushes, as cheap as they come
*mod podge
*ecojot 5x7 sketchbooks
*Daler-Rowney 135 lb HeavyWeight paper pads         

Why do I love these supplies?

I am extremely privileged to come from a family who values and appreciates art-making. My dad does really beautiful, strange paintings and drawings of wildlife and rural settings, my mom makes bizarrely lovely puppets and hats, & my sister is a comic artist who makes these amazing sequential inkwashes. I grew up in a supportive and creative environment, and this has extended to my adult life: my parents still send me care packages with art supplies every so often, and I really can’t overstate how crucial that is to my practice. Like many artists, I am low-income, and a couple of good pens in the mail make a world of difference. Thanks, parents!

I just discovered Prismacolor pens after years of loyalty to only Faber-Castell. My ex-boyfriend gave me a beautiful set of ‘em when I got married last summer, and I’m hooked!

As for paper, I’ve been buying the exact same sketchbook for years. It’s a nice, cheap option and I like the plain covers for drawing on. It’s not the most ideal paper for painting on, but I’m not a fancy kind of gal - I just use Photoshop to clean up the wrinkles. If I’m illustrating for a client, though, I use a sturdier option like 135 lb cold-pressed bristol board - I usually only need two or three big pads of those a year.

The nicest thing for art-making that I own is my beautiful drafting table, which my best friends and husband went in on together for my birthday last year. When I’m working on a piece, I keep the upper right hand corner covered in magazine clippings, postcards, stickers - anything that matches the aesthetic I’m going for - as inspiration and to focus my practice.

As you can see, I am very lucky to have others looking out for me and encouraging my practice. Though I live in a society that doesn’t value or pay artists, I am so fortunate to be part of a community that actively fosters my work. I try to do my best to put that positive energy back into the world with my drawings, and through supporting other artists as they support me <3



Who: Elana Delaney (secularspecter on tumblr) – illustrator, mixed media artist and currently on hiatus editor of The Continuist 

Supplies:
Bic mechanical pencils
kneaded eraser
black Staedtler 0.1 mm pigment liner pens
black Sakura drawing pens (0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.45 mm, 0.6 mm, 1.0 mm)
Prismacolor marker set
Bic and Staples brand highlighters
small tub of pencil crayons, mostly Laurentien, Crayola and Prismacolour
flat tip and pointed round tip paint brushes
Delta Ceramcoat, DecoArt and FolkArt acrylic paint in 2 oz. bottles
Elmer’s disappearing purple glue stick
11 x 14 sketchbook and found paper scraps
iTunes library for focus and creative vibes
Why I love them:
I use mechanical pencils because I like how clicking the top is faster than sharpening all the time to maintain a very thin tip to draw with. The kneaded eraser works by picking up the granite from your pencil so it doesn’t leave eraser shavings and it’s like a ball of sticky tack that you keep stretching and reshaping and it seems to absorb all the granite in the world without leaving any residue on your page and I love it and it’s the best thing evaaaaaar!!!
I buy a few different sizes of black, smear and fade resistant, waterproof drawing pens because in my drawings I like to use solid lines of varying thickness, outlined shapes and big spaces of solid black or white. I can draw thin shading lines, wires or eyelashes and tiny details like reflections on eyeballs, tiny windows on tiny buildings, tiny diamonds, tiny hearts, tiny text, you know. I can also fill in thick chunks of hair or clouds of smoke or the backgrounds of portraits with black to create never ending voids of unknown nothingness for my drawings to float in.
My Prismacolour markers are awesome because they have one fine tip and one broad tip which is handy for filling in both tiny shapes and large areas of solid colour. I also love the way they blend like water colours. I’ve recently starting using highlighters in my drawings because I love how bright they are.
I’ve had the bottles of acrylic paint since I was 5 when my mom stocked them in the brilliant craft room she built for me. There’s a collection of about 40 colours and I took 15 with me when I moved out. Side note: that craft room was a sanctuary of glue guns, markers, paint, pencil crayons, fabric, pipe cleaners, sea shells, beads, gimp, string, cardboard boxes, walnut shells, sequins, plastic jewels, miniature appliances and furniture, feathers, marbles, stickers, patterned paper and a multitude of other items you might not expect to be used in the making of crafts but which I was overjoyed to paint, bejewel and glue to things. 
I collect paper of varying sizes, colours and textures to draw on as well as cardboard which I like to paint and glue drawings to. I like round or long rectangular pieces of cardboard but the star of my collection is a heart shaped piece from a box of chocolates.  Stored in a plastic Kuririn (a friend of Hello Kitty) bag is my collection of various…gluable items that I find pleasing to the eye - maps, stickers, menus, flyers, extra copies of zines, newspaper comics, pogs, postcards. I cut out the best parts or keep them intact before they end up on either a mixed media piece in combination with my drawings, in a sketchbook or on a bulletin board. They may also get glued in one of my ‘scrapbook/collage/visual journal of memories and pretty things I’ve found’ which I don’t post much of online but maybe one day I will.


Who: Elana Delaney (secularspecter on tumblr) – illustrator, mixed media artist and currently on hiatus editor of The Continuist 

Supplies:
Bic mechanical pencils
kneaded eraser
black Staedtler 0.1 mm pigment liner pens
black Sakura drawing pens (0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.45 mm, 0.6 mm, 1.0 mm)
Prismacolor marker set
Bic and Staples brand highlighters
small tub of pencil crayons, mostly Laurentien, Crayola and Prismacolour
flat tip and pointed round tip paint brushes
Delta Ceramcoat, DecoArt and FolkArt acrylic paint in 2 oz. bottles
Elmer’s disappearing purple glue stick
11 x 14 sketchbook and found paper scraps
iTunes library for focus and creative vibes
Why I love them:
I use mechanical pencils because I like how clicking the top is faster than sharpening all the time to maintain a very thin tip to draw with. The kneaded eraser works by picking up the granite from your pencil so it doesn’t leave eraser shavings and it’s like a ball of sticky tack that you keep stretching and reshaping and it seems to absorb all the granite in the world without leaving any residue on your page and I love it and it’s the best thing evaaaaaar!!!
I buy a few different sizes of black, smear and fade resistant, waterproof drawing pens because in my drawings I like to use solid lines of varying thickness, outlined shapes and big spaces of solid black or white. I can draw thin shading lines, wires or eyelashes and tiny details like reflections on eyeballs, tiny windows on tiny buildings, tiny diamonds, tiny hearts, tiny text, you know. I can also fill in thick chunks of hair or clouds of smoke or the backgrounds of portraits with black to create never ending voids of unknown nothingness for my drawings to float in.
My Prismacolour markers are awesome because they have one fine tip and one broad tip which is handy for filling in both tiny shapes and large areas of solid colour. I also love the way they blend like water colours. I’ve recently starting using highlighters in my drawings because I love how bright they are.
I’ve had the bottles of acrylic paint since I was 5 when my mom stocked them in the brilliant craft room she built for me. There’s a collection of about 40 colours and I took 15 with me when I moved out. Side note: that craft room was a sanctuary of glue guns, markers, paint, pencil crayons, fabric, pipe cleaners, sea shells, beads, gimp, string, cardboard boxes, walnut shells, sequins, plastic jewels, miniature appliances and furniture, feathers, marbles, stickers, patterned paper and a multitude of other items you might not expect to be used in the making of crafts but which I was overjoyed to paint, bejewel and glue to things. 
I collect paper of varying sizes, colours and textures to draw on as well as cardboard which I like to paint and glue drawings to. I like round or long rectangular pieces of cardboard but the star of my collection is a heart shaped piece from a box of chocolates.  Stored in a plastic Kuririn (a friend of Hello Kitty) bag is my collection of various…gluable items that I find pleasing to the eye - maps, stickers, menus, flyers, extra copies of zines, newspaper comics, pogs, postcards. I cut out the best parts or keep them intact before they end up on either a mixed media piece in combination with my drawings, in a sketchbook or on a bulletin board. They may also get glued in one of my ‘scrapbook/collage/visual journal of memories and pretty things I’ve found’ which I don’t post much of online but maybe one day I will.


Who: Elana Delaney (secularspecter on tumblr) – illustrator, mixed media artist and currently on hiatus editor of The Continuist 

Supplies:
Bic mechanical pencils
kneaded eraser
black Staedtler 0.1 mm pigment liner pens
black Sakura drawing pens (0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.45 mm, 0.6 mm, 1.0 mm)
Prismacolor marker set
Bic and Staples brand highlighters
small tub of pencil crayons, mostly Laurentien, Crayola and Prismacolour
flat tip and pointed round tip paint brushes
Delta Ceramcoat, DecoArt and FolkArt acrylic paint in 2 oz. bottles
Elmer’s disappearing purple glue stick
11 x 14 sketchbook and found paper scraps
iTunes library for focus and creative vibes
Why I love them:
I use mechanical pencils because I like how clicking the top is faster than sharpening all the time to maintain a very thin tip to draw with. The kneaded eraser works by picking up the granite from your pencil so it doesn’t leave eraser shavings and it’s like a ball of sticky tack that you keep stretching and reshaping and it seems to absorb all the granite in the world without leaving any residue on your page and I love it and it’s the best thing evaaaaaar!!!
I buy a few different sizes of black, smear and fade resistant, waterproof drawing pens because in my drawings I like to use solid lines of varying thickness, outlined shapes and big spaces of solid black or white. I can draw thin shading lines, wires or eyelashes and tiny details like reflections on eyeballs, tiny windows on tiny buildings, tiny diamonds, tiny hearts, tiny text, you know. I can also fill in thick chunks of hair or clouds of smoke or the backgrounds of portraits with black to create never ending voids of unknown nothingness for my drawings to float in.
My Prismacolour markers are awesome because they have one fine tip and one broad tip which is handy for filling in both tiny shapes and large areas of solid colour. I also love the way they blend like water colours. I’ve recently starting using highlighters in my drawings because I love how bright they are.
I’ve had the bottles of acrylic paint since I was 5 when my mom stocked them in the brilliant craft room she built for me. There’s a collection of about 40 colours and I took 15 with me when I moved out. Side note: that craft room was a sanctuary of glue guns, markers, paint, pencil crayons, fabric, pipe cleaners, sea shells, beads, gimp, string, cardboard boxes, walnut shells, sequins, plastic jewels, miniature appliances and furniture, feathers, marbles, stickers, patterned paper and a multitude of other items you might not expect to be used in the making of crafts but which I was overjoyed to paint, bejewel and glue to things. 
I collect paper of varying sizes, colours and textures to draw on as well as cardboard which I like to paint and glue drawings to. I like round or long rectangular pieces of cardboard but the star of my collection is a heart shaped piece from a box of chocolates.  Stored in a plastic Kuririn (a friend of Hello Kitty) bag is my collection of various…gluable items that I find pleasing to the eye - maps, stickers, menus, flyers, extra copies of zines, newspaper comics, pogs, postcards. I cut out the best parts or keep them intact before they end up on either a mixed media piece in combination with my drawings, in a sketchbook or on a bulletin board. They may also get glued in one of my ‘scrapbook/collage/visual journal of memories and pretty things I’ve found’ which I don’t post much of online but maybe one day I will.


Who: Elana Delaney (secularspecter on tumblr) – illustrator, mixed media artist and currently on hiatus editor of The Continuist 

Supplies:
Bic mechanical pencils
kneaded eraser
black Staedtler 0.1 mm pigment liner pens
black Sakura drawing pens (0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.45 mm, 0.6 mm, 1.0 mm)
Prismacolor marker set
Bic and Staples brand highlighters
small tub of pencil crayons, mostly Laurentien, Crayola and Prismacolour
flat tip and pointed round tip paint brushes
Delta Ceramcoat, DecoArt and FolkArt acrylic paint in 2 oz. bottles
Elmer’s disappearing purple glue stick
11 x 14 sketchbook and found paper scraps
iTunes library for focus and creative vibes
Why I love them:
I use mechanical pencils because I like how clicking the top is faster than sharpening all the time to maintain a very thin tip to draw with. The kneaded eraser works by picking up the granite from your pencil so it doesn’t leave eraser shavings and it’s like a ball of sticky tack that you keep stretching and reshaping and it seems to absorb all the granite in the world without leaving any residue on your page and I love it and it’s the best thing evaaaaaar!!!
I buy a few different sizes of black, smear and fade resistant, waterproof drawing pens because in my drawings I like to use solid lines of varying thickness, outlined shapes and big spaces of solid black or white. I can draw thin shading lines, wires or eyelashes and tiny details like reflections on eyeballs, tiny windows on tiny buildings, tiny diamonds, tiny hearts, tiny text, you know. I can also fill in thick chunks of hair or clouds of smoke or the backgrounds of portraits with black to create never ending voids of unknown nothingness for my drawings to float in.
My Prismacolour markers are awesome because they have one fine tip and one broad tip which is handy for filling in both tiny shapes and large areas of solid colour. I also love the way they blend like water colours. I’ve recently starting using highlighters in my drawings because I love how bright they are.
I’ve had the bottles of acrylic paint since I was 5 when my mom stocked them in the brilliant craft room she built for me. There’s a collection of about 40 colours and I took 15 with me when I moved out. Side note: that craft room was a sanctuary of glue guns, markers, paint, pencil crayons, fabric, pipe cleaners, sea shells, beads, gimp, string, cardboard boxes, walnut shells, sequins, plastic jewels, miniature appliances and furniture, feathers, marbles, stickers, patterned paper and a multitude of other items you might not expect to be used in the making of crafts but which I was overjoyed to paint, bejewel and glue to things. 
I collect paper of varying sizes, colours and textures to draw on as well as cardboard which I like to paint and glue drawings to. I like round or long rectangular pieces of cardboard but the star of my collection is a heart shaped piece from a box of chocolates.  Stored in a plastic Kuririn (a friend of Hello Kitty) bag is my collection of various…gluable items that I find pleasing to the eye - maps, stickers, menus, flyers, extra copies of zines, newspaper comics, pogs, postcards. I cut out the best parts or keep them intact before they end up on either a mixed media piece in combination with my drawings, in a sketchbook or on a bulletin board. They may also get glued in one of my ‘scrapbook/collage/visual journal of memories and pretty things I’ve found’ which I don’t post much of online but maybe one day I will.


Who: Elana Delaney (secularspecter on tumblr) – illustrator, mixed media artist and currently on hiatus editor of The Continuist 

Supplies:
Bic mechanical pencils
kneaded eraser
black Staedtler 0.1 mm pigment liner pens
black Sakura drawing pens (0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.45 mm, 0.6 mm, 1.0 mm)
Prismacolor marker set
Bic and Staples brand highlighters
small tub of pencil crayons, mostly Laurentien, Crayola and Prismacolour
flat tip and pointed round tip paint brushes
Delta Ceramcoat, DecoArt and FolkArt acrylic paint in 2 oz. bottles
Elmer’s disappearing purple glue stick
11 x 14 sketchbook and found paper scraps
iTunes library for focus and creative vibes
Why I love them:
I use mechanical pencils because I like how clicking the top is faster than sharpening all the time to maintain a very thin tip to draw with. The kneaded eraser works by picking up the granite from your pencil so it doesn’t leave eraser shavings and it’s like a ball of sticky tack that you keep stretching and reshaping and it seems to absorb all the granite in the world without leaving any residue on your page and I love it and it’s the best thing evaaaaaar!!!
I buy a few different sizes of black, smear and fade resistant, waterproof drawing pens because in my drawings I like to use solid lines of varying thickness, outlined shapes and big spaces of solid black or white. I can draw thin shading lines, wires or eyelashes and tiny details like reflections on eyeballs, tiny windows on tiny buildings, tiny diamonds, tiny hearts, tiny text, you know. I can also fill in thick chunks of hair or clouds of smoke or the backgrounds of portraits with black to create never ending voids of unknown nothingness for my drawings to float in.
My Prismacolour markers are awesome because they have one fine tip and one broad tip which is handy for filling in both tiny shapes and large areas of solid colour. I also love the way they blend like water colours. I’ve recently starting using highlighters in my drawings because I love how bright they are.
I’ve had the bottles of acrylic paint since I was 5 when my mom stocked them in the brilliant craft room she built for me. There’s a collection of about 40 colours and I took 15 with me when I moved out. Side note: that craft room was a sanctuary of glue guns, markers, paint, pencil crayons, fabric, pipe cleaners, sea shells, beads, gimp, string, cardboard boxes, walnut shells, sequins, plastic jewels, miniature appliances and furniture, feathers, marbles, stickers, patterned paper and a multitude of other items you might not expect to be used in the making of crafts but which I was overjoyed to paint, bejewel and glue to things. 
I collect paper of varying sizes, colours and textures to draw on as well as cardboard which I like to paint and glue drawings to. I like round or long rectangular pieces of cardboard but the star of my collection is a heart shaped piece from a box of chocolates.  Stored in a plastic Kuririn (a friend of Hello Kitty) bag is my collection of various…gluable items that I find pleasing to the eye - maps, stickers, menus, flyers, extra copies of zines, newspaper comics, pogs, postcards. I cut out the best parts or keep them intact before they end up on either a mixed media piece in combination with my drawings, in a sketchbook or on a bulletin board. They may also get glued in one of my ‘scrapbook/collage/visual journal of memories and pretty things I’ve found’ which I don’t post much of online but maybe one day I will.

Who: Elana Delaney (secularspecter on tumblr) – illustrator, mixed media artist and currently on hiatus editor of The Continuist 

Supplies:

  • Bic mechanical pencils
  • kneaded eraser
  • black Staedtler 0.1 mm pigment liner pens
  • black Sakura drawing pens (0.3 mm, 0.4 mm, 0.45 mm, 0.6 mm, 1.0 mm)
  • Prismacolor marker set
  • Bic and Staples brand highlighters
  • small tub of pencil crayons, mostly Laurentien, Crayola and Prismacolour
  • flat tip and pointed round tip paint brushes
  • Delta Ceramcoat, DecoArt and FolkArt acrylic paint in 2 oz. bottles
  • Elmer’s disappearing purple glue stick
  • 11 x 14 sketchbook and found paper scraps
  • iTunes library for focus and creative vibes

Why I love them:

I use mechanical pencils because I like how clicking the top is faster than sharpening all the time to maintain a very thin tip to draw with. The kneaded eraser works by picking up the granite from your pencil so it doesn’t leave eraser shavings and it’s like a ball of sticky tack that you keep stretching and reshaping and it seems to absorb all the granite in the world without leaving any residue on your page and I love it and it’s the best thing evaaaaaar!!!

I buy a few different sizes of black, smear and fade resistant, waterproof drawing pens because in my drawings I like to use solid lines of varying thickness, outlined shapes and big spaces of solid black or white. I can draw thin shading lines, wires or eyelashes and tiny details like reflections on eyeballs, tiny windows on tiny buildings, tiny diamonds, tiny hearts, tiny text, you know. I can also fill in thick chunks of hair or clouds of smoke or the backgrounds of portraits with black to create never ending voids of unknown nothingness for my drawings to float in.

My Prismacolour markers are awesome because they have one fine tip and one broad tip which is handy for filling in both tiny shapes and large areas of solid colour. I also love the way they blend like water colours. I’ve recently starting using highlighters in my drawings because I love how bright they are.

I’ve had the bottles of acrylic paint since I was 5 when my mom stocked them in the brilliant craft room she built for me. There’s a collection of about 40 colours and I took 15 with me when I moved out. Side note: that craft room was a sanctuary of glue guns, markers, paint, pencil crayons, fabric, pipe cleaners, sea shells, beads, gimp, string, cardboard boxes, walnut shells, sequins, plastic jewels, miniature appliances and furniture, feathers, marbles, stickers, patterned paper and a multitude of other items you might not expect to be used in the making of crafts but which I was overjoyed to paint, bejewel and glue to things. 

I collect paper of varying sizes, colours and textures to draw on as well as cardboard which I like to paint and glue drawings to. I like round or long rectangular pieces of cardboard but the star of my collection is a heart shaped piece from a box of chocolates.  Stored in a plastic Kuririn (a friend of Hello Kitty) bag is my collection of various…gluable items that I find pleasing to the eye - maps, stickers, menus, flyers, extra copies of zines, newspaper comics, pogs, postcards. I cut out the best parts or keep them intact before they end up on either a mixed media piece in combination with my drawings, in a sketchbook or on a bulletin board. They may also get glued in one of my ‘scrapbook/collage/visual journal of memories and pretty things I’ve found’ which I don’t post much of online but maybe one day I will.

Who: Robb Mirsky - Independent illustrator and cartoonist from Toronto.Supplies:
Pental Pocket Brush
Pigma Micron Pens (05 and 01)
Pilot, blue coloured, led pencil
Pilot G-tec-C4 pen (0.4)
Canson heavyweight illustration paper
Strathmore bristol pad
Canson comic book art boards
Long arm stapler
Guillotine
Drafting Table
My scanner (it&#8217;s old&#8230;)
Photoshop
Why do I love these supplies?I&#8217;m always switching up my supplies and on the hunt for a “better” pen or paper. This list is the stuff I currently use, but who’s to say in six months or so&#8230;My pocket brush is probably my favourite of my tools. It helps me train to use a brush while still having the feel of a pen. I have never felt comfortable with using a brush, but the tip itself doesn&#8217;t fray, leaving one solid line every time. My work has also gotten bolder and faster to make since the addition of the pocket brush. It&#8217;s an investment, but well worth it, and you can refill the cartridges! I don&#8217;t use it exclusively, but a combo of it, and my other pens to make crisp, clean lines.With using the pocket brush, I have had to use more quality, no bleed, paper. Depending on the piece I am working on I switch between my three pads. It also helps that they are all different sizes. For a lot of my full page comics, I like using the comic book art boards because they are 11x17 sheets. When you scale down a drawing that size to a quarter of the size, the details just start to look really good. Also, the art board sheets are pre-marked, so I have to use less rulers (I don&#8217;t like rulers&#8230;).Once i am done drawing everything by hand, I scan it into my computer to format the size properly, edit and clean up any mistakes and splotches, and possibly colour or add some grey scale shadows. I try to avoid the use of too much computer because I have a terrible track record with them&#8230; And I only colour my pieces when the project calls for it, or I&#8217;m feeling extra sassy. I am kinda colour-blind, so I try to avoid the use of too many colours. It makes my head spin!I do a lot of my own comic book assembly at home, so my guillotine and my long arm stapler are pretty crucial pieces to the puzzle. And well, my drafting table and studio at home may be the most important part. Without them, I would still be working on a couch with a lot of back pain&#8230; Who: Robb Mirsky - Independent illustrator and cartoonist from Toronto.Supplies:
Pental Pocket Brush
Pigma Micron Pens (05 and 01)
Pilot, blue coloured, led pencil
Pilot G-tec-C4 pen (0.4)
Canson heavyweight illustration paper
Strathmore bristol pad
Canson comic book art boards
Long arm stapler
Guillotine
Drafting Table
My scanner (it&#8217;s old&#8230;)
Photoshop
Why do I love these supplies?I&#8217;m always switching up my supplies and on the hunt for a “better” pen or paper. This list is the stuff I currently use, but who’s to say in six months or so&#8230;My pocket brush is probably my favourite of my tools. It helps me train to use a brush while still having the feel of a pen. I have never felt comfortable with using a brush, but the tip itself doesn&#8217;t fray, leaving one solid line every time. My work has also gotten bolder and faster to make since the addition of the pocket brush. It&#8217;s an investment, but well worth it, and you can refill the cartridges! I don&#8217;t use it exclusively, but a combo of it, and my other pens to make crisp, clean lines.With using the pocket brush, I have had to use more quality, no bleed, paper. Depending on the piece I am working on I switch between my three pads. It also helps that they are all different sizes. For a lot of my full page comics, I like using the comic book art boards because they are 11x17 sheets. When you scale down a drawing that size to a quarter of the size, the details just start to look really good. Also, the art board sheets are pre-marked, so I have to use less rulers (I don&#8217;t like rulers&#8230;).Once i am done drawing everything by hand, I scan it into my computer to format the size properly, edit and clean up any mistakes and splotches, and possibly colour or add some grey scale shadows. I try to avoid the use of too much computer because I have a terrible track record with them&#8230; And I only colour my pieces when the project calls for it, or I&#8217;m feeling extra sassy. I am kinda colour-blind, so I try to avoid the use of too many colours. It makes my head spin!I do a lot of my own comic book assembly at home, so my guillotine and my long arm stapler are pretty crucial pieces to the puzzle. And well, my drafting table and studio at home may be the most important part. Without them, I would still be working on a couch with a lot of back pain&#8230; Who: Robb Mirsky - Independent illustrator and cartoonist from Toronto.Supplies:
Pental Pocket Brush
Pigma Micron Pens (05 and 01)
Pilot, blue coloured, led pencil
Pilot G-tec-C4 pen (0.4)
Canson heavyweight illustration paper
Strathmore bristol pad
Canson comic book art boards
Long arm stapler
Guillotine
Drafting Table
My scanner (it&#8217;s old&#8230;)
Photoshop
Why do I love these supplies?I&#8217;m always switching up my supplies and on the hunt for a “better” pen or paper. This list is the stuff I currently use, but who’s to say in six months or so&#8230;My pocket brush is probably my favourite of my tools. It helps me train to use a brush while still having the feel of a pen. I have never felt comfortable with using a brush, but the tip itself doesn&#8217;t fray, leaving one solid line every time. My work has also gotten bolder and faster to make since the addition of the pocket brush. It&#8217;s an investment, but well worth it, and you can refill the cartridges! I don&#8217;t use it exclusively, but a combo of it, and my other pens to make crisp, clean lines.With using the pocket brush, I have had to use more quality, no bleed, paper. Depending on the piece I am working on I switch between my three pads. It also helps that they are all different sizes. For a lot of my full page comics, I like using the comic book art boards because they are 11x17 sheets. When you scale down a drawing that size to a quarter of the size, the details just start to look really good. Also, the art board sheets are pre-marked, so I have to use less rulers (I don&#8217;t like rulers&#8230;).Once i am done drawing everything by hand, I scan it into my computer to format the size properly, edit and clean up any mistakes and splotches, and possibly colour or add some grey scale shadows. I try to avoid the use of too much computer because I have a terrible track record with them&#8230; And I only colour my pieces when the project calls for it, or I&#8217;m feeling extra sassy. I am kinda colour-blind, so I try to avoid the use of too many colours. It makes my head spin!I do a lot of my own comic book assembly at home, so my guillotine and my long arm stapler are pretty crucial pieces to the puzzle. And well, my drafting table and studio at home may be the most important part. Without them, I would still be working on a couch with a lot of back pain&#8230; Who: Robb Mirsky - Independent illustrator and cartoonist from Toronto.Supplies:
Pental Pocket Brush
Pigma Micron Pens (05 and 01)
Pilot, blue coloured, led pencil
Pilot G-tec-C4 pen (0.4)
Canson heavyweight illustration paper
Strathmore bristol pad
Canson comic book art boards
Long arm stapler
Guillotine
Drafting Table
My scanner (it&#8217;s old&#8230;)
Photoshop
Why do I love these supplies?I&#8217;m always switching up my supplies and on the hunt for a “better” pen or paper. This list is the stuff I currently use, but who’s to say in six months or so&#8230;My pocket brush is probably my favourite of my tools. It helps me train to use a brush while still having the feel of a pen. I have never felt comfortable with using a brush, but the tip itself doesn&#8217;t fray, leaving one solid line every time. My work has also gotten bolder and faster to make since the addition of the pocket brush. It&#8217;s an investment, but well worth it, and you can refill the cartridges! I don&#8217;t use it exclusively, but a combo of it, and my other pens to make crisp, clean lines.With using the pocket brush, I have had to use more quality, no bleed, paper. Depending on the piece I am working on I switch between my three pads. It also helps that they are all different sizes. For a lot of my full page comics, I like using the comic book art boards because they are 11x17 sheets. When you scale down a drawing that size to a quarter of the size, the details just start to look really good. Also, the art board sheets are pre-marked, so I have to use less rulers (I don&#8217;t like rulers&#8230;).Once i am done drawing everything by hand, I scan it into my computer to format the size properly, edit and clean up any mistakes and splotches, and possibly colour or add some grey scale shadows. I try to avoid the use of too much computer because I have a terrible track record with them&#8230; And I only colour my pieces when the project calls for it, or I&#8217;m feeling extra sassy. I am kinda colour-blind, so I try to avoid the use of too many colours. It makes my head spin!I do a lot of my own comic book assembly at home, so my guillotine and my long arm stapler are pretty crucial pieces to the puzzle. And well, my drafting table and studio at home may be the most important part. Without them, I would still be working on a couch with a lot of back pain&#8230;

Who: Robb Mirsky - Independent illustrator and cartoonist from Toronto.

Supplies:

  • Pental Pocket Brush
  • Pigma Micron Pens (05 and 01)
  • Pilot, blue coloured, led pencil
  • Pilot G-tec-C4 pen (0.4)
  • Canson heavyweight illustration paper
  • Strathmore bristol pad
  • Canson comic book art boards
  • Long arm stapler
  • Guillotine
  • Drafting Table
  • My scanner (it’s old…)
  • Photoshop

Why do I love these supplies?

I’m always switching up my supplies and on the hunt for a “better” pen or paper. This list is the stuff I currently use, but who’s to say in six months or so…

My pocket brush is probably my favourite of my tools. It helps me train to use a brush while still having the feel of a pen. I have never felt comfortable with using a brush, but the tip itself doesn’t fray, leaving one solid line every time. My work has also gotten bolder and faster to make since the addition of the pocket brush. It’s an investment, but well worth it, and you can refill the cartridges! I don’t use it exclusively, but a combo of it, and my other pens to make crisp, clean lines.

With using the pocket brush, I have had to use more quality, no bleed, paper. Depending on the piece I am working on I switch between my three pads. It also helps that they are all different sizes. For a lot of my full page comics, I like using the comic book art boards because they are 11x17 sheets. When you scale down a drawing that size to a quarter of the size, the details just start to look really good. Also, the art board sheets are pre-marked, so I have to use less rulers (I don’t like rulers…).

Once i am done drawing everything by hand, I scan it into my computer to format the size properly, edit and clean up any mistakes and splotches, and possibly colour or add some grey scale shadows. I try to avoid the use of too much computer because I have a terrible track record with them… And I only colour my pieces when the project calls for it, or I’m feeling extra sassy. I am kinda colour-blind, so I try to avoid the use of too many colours. It makes my head spin!

I do a lot of my own comic book assembly at home, so my guillotine and my long arm stapler are pretty crucial pieces to the puzzle. And well, my drafting table and studio at home may be the most important part. Without them, I would still be working on a couch with a lot of back pain…

Who: Megan Stulberg - student, illustrator, painter &amp; editor of The Continuist zine, living in Toronto, Ontario.Supplies:
Paintbrushes - all sizes, usually flat or round tip. All from Curry&#8217;s.
Liquitex BASICS acrylic paint (at least 50 tubes lying around my apartment, seriously)
Copics coloured markers
Canson watercolour paper
Simple 12 piece watercolour set
Black Optiflow pens
Plastic palette  
Moleskine pocket sketchbook
My precious, precious iPhone 5 for photo references on-the-go.
Why do I like these supplies?There are certain materials I&#8217;ve tried out that I really, really hate. In 2010, I spent four months straight working on three 18x24 detailed realism drawings - all in pencil. I still consider those pieces as my best work to date, but I hated the process. Using pencil is very time consuming, messy and I&#8217;ve avoiding it since. Lately I&#8217;ve been working with watercolours a lot. I love its unstructured flow and how the colours blend together effortlessly. I&#8217;ll always use a black pen to add outlines overtop to tie everything together. I&#8217;m generally very happy with the final product.Generally, I work with black pens a lot. I haven&#8217;t done an ink-based drawing in a while, just because it takes a while to finish a piece. I&#8217;m a full-time university student (not in art school, wah) so when I finally have time to do some quality art-ing, there&#8217;s a pretty big chance that I&#8217;ve already changed my idea about a piece and will start over. I like using basic Optiflow pens from Staples. I have black pens from actual art stores but honestly, I go through these so quickly and they work pretty much the same so I tend to buy cheap and in bulk whenever possible. The &#8220;cheap and in bulk&#8221; mentality goes for my paints and paintbrushes too. Liquitex BASICS are inexpensive, come in a variety of colours, and work well, from my experience. I tend to use them on canvas or on wood. I&#8217;m working on a cacti themed piece right now on a piece of wood using BASICS.  My pocket sketchbook is the most useful to me, as I&#8217;m able to use it on break at work, on the streetcar, wherever. If I have my sketchbook and a pen in my bag - I&#8217;m set! I&#8217;m always working on and changing my style, so my materials change accordingly. Hopefully, I&#8217;ll be adding a digital tablet and large scale canvases to the list above in the near future. Who: Megan Stulberg - student, illustrator, painter &amp; editor of The Continuist zine, living in Toronto, Ontario.Supplies:
Paintbrushes - all sizes, usually flat or round tip. All from Curry&#8217;s.
Liquitex BASICS acrylic paint (at least 50 tubes lying around my apartment, seriously)
Copics coloured markers
Canson watercolour paper
Simple 12 piece watercolour set
Black Optiflow pens
Plastic palette  
Moleskine pocket sketchbook
My precious, precious iPhone 5 for photo references on-the-go.
Why do I like these supplies?There are certain materials I&#8217;ve tried out that I really, really hate. In 2010, I spent four months straight working on three 18x24 detailed realism drawings - all in pencil. I still consider those pieces as my best work to date, but I hated the process. Using pencil is very time consuming, messy and I&#8217;ve avoiding it since. Lately I&#8217;ve been working with watercolours a lot. I love its unstructured flow and how the colours blend together effortlessly. I&#8217;ll always use a black pen to add outlines overtop to tie everything together. I&#8217;m generally very happy with the final product.Generally, I work with black pens a lot. I haven&#8217;t done an ink-based drawing in a while, just because it takes a while to finish a piece. I&#8217;m a full-time university student (not in art school, wah) so when I finally have time to do some quality art-ing, there&#8217;s a pretty big chance that I&#8217;ve already changed my idea about a piece and will start over. I like using basic Optiflow pens from Staples. I have black pens from actual art stores but honestly, I go through these so quickly and they work pretty much the same so I tend to buy cheap and in bulk whenever possible. The &#8220;cheap and in bulk&#8221; mentality goes for my paints and paintbrushes too. Liquitex BASICS are inexpensive, come in a variety of colours, and work well, from my experience. I tend to use them on canvas or on wood. I&#8217;m working on a cacti themed piece right now on a piece of wood using BASICS.  My pocket sketchbook is the most useful to me, as I&#8217;m able to use it on break at work, on the streetcar, wherever. If I have my sketchbook and a pen in my bag - I&#8217;m set! I&#8217;m always working on and changing my style, so my materials change accordingly. Hopefully, I&#8217;ll be adding a digital tablet and large scale canvases to the list above in the near future. Who: Megan Stulberg - student, illustrator, painter &amp; editor of The Continuist zine, living in Toronto, Ontario.Supplies:
Paintbrushes - all sizes, usually flat or round tip. All from Curry&#8217;s.
Liquitex BASICS acrylic paint (at least 50 tubes lying around my apartment, seriously)
Copics coloured markers
Canson watercolour paper
Simple 12 piece watercolour set
Black Optiflow pens
Plastic palette  
Moleskine pocket sketchbook
My precious, precious iPhone 5 for photo references on-the-go.
Why do I like these supplies?There are certain materials I&#8217;ve tried out that I really, really hate. In 2010, I spent four months straight working on three 18x24 detailed realism drawings - all in pencil. I still consider those pieces as my best work to date, but I hated the process. Using pencil is very time consuming, messy and I&#8217;ve avoiding it since. Lately I&#8217;ve been working with watercolours a lot. I love its unstructured flow and how the colours blend together effortlessly. I&#8217;ll always use a black pen to add outlines overtop to tie everything together. I&#8217;m generally very happy with the final product.Generally, I work with black pens a lot. I haven&#8217;t done an ink-based drawing in a while, just because it takes a while to finish a piece. I&#8217;m a full-time university student (not in art school, wah) so when I finally have time to do some quality art-ing, there&#8217;s a pretty big chance that I&#8217;ve already changed my idea about a piece and will start over. I like using basic Optiflow pens from Staples. I have black pens from actual art stores but honestly, I go through these so quickly and they work pretty much the same so I tend to buy cheap and in bulk whenever possible. The &#8220;cheap and in bulk&#8221; mentality goes for my paints and paintbrushes too. Liquitex BASICS are inexpensive, come in a variety of colours, and work well, from my experience. I tend to use them on canvas or on wood. I&#8217;m working on a cacti themed piece right now on a piece of wood using BASICS.  My pocket sketchbook is the most useful to me, as I&#8217;m able to use it on break at work, on the streetcar, wherever. If I have my sketchbook and a pen in my bag - I&#8217;m set! I&#8217;m always working on and changing my style, so my materials change accordingly. Hopefully, I&#8217;ll be adding a digital tablet and large scale canvases to the list above in the near future. Who: Megan Stulberg - student, illustrator, painter &amp; editor of The Continuist zine, living in Toronto, Ontario.Supplies:
Paintbrushes - all sizes, usually flat or round tip. All from Curry&#8217;s.
Liquitex BASICS acrylic paint (at least 50 tubes lying around my apartment, seriously)
Copics coloured markers
Canson watercolour paper
Simple 12 piece watercolour set
Black Optiflow pens
Plastic palette  
Moleskine pocket sketchbook
My precious, precious iPhone 5 for photo references on-the-go.
Why do I like these supplies?There are certain materials I&#8217;ve tried out that I really, really hate. In 2010, I spent four months straight working on three 18x24 detailed realism drawings - all in pencil. I still consider those pieces as my best work to date, but I hated the process. Using pencil is very time consuming, messy and I&#8217;ve avoiding it since. Lately I&#8217;ve been working with watercolours a lot. I love its unstructured flow and how the colours blend together effortlessly. I&#8217;ll always use a black pen to add outlines overtop to tie everything together. I&#8217;m generally very happy with the final product.Generally, I work with black pens a lot. I haven&#8217;t done an ink-based drawing in a while, just because it takes a while to finish a piece. I&#8217;m a full-time university student (not in art school, wah) so when I finally have time to do some quality art-ing, there&#8217;s a pretty big chance that I&#8217;ve already changed my idea about a piece and will start over. I like using basic Optiflow pens from Staples. I have black pens from actual art stores but honestly, I go through these so quickly and they work pretty much the same so I tend to buy cheap and in bulk whenever possible. The &#8220;cheap and in bulk&#8221; mentality goes for my paints and paintbrushes too. Liquitex BASICS are inexpensive, come in a variety of colours, and work well, from my experience. I tend to use them on canvas or on wood. I&#8217;m working on a cacti themed piece right now on a piece of wood using BASICS.  My pocket sketchbook is the most useful to me, as I&#8217;m able to use it on break at work, on the streetcar, wherever. If I have my sketchbook and a pen in my bag - I&#8217;m set! I&#8217;m always working on and changing my style, so my materials change accordingly. Hopefully, I&#8217;ll be adding a digital tablet and large scale canvases to the list above in the near future. Who: Megan Stulberg - student, illustrator, painter &amp; editor of The Continuist zine, living in Toronto, Ontario.Supplies:
Paintbrushes - all sizes, usually flat or round tip. All from Curry&#8217;s.
Liquitex BASICS acrylic paint (at least 50 tubes lying around my apartment, seriously)
Copics coloured markers
Canson watercolour paper
Simple 12 piece watercolour set
Black Optiflow pens
Plastic palette  
Moleskine pocket sketchbook
My precious, precious iPhone 5 for photo references on-the-go.
Why do I like these supplies?There are certain materials I&#8217;ve tried out that I really, really hate. In 2010, I spent four months straight working on three 18x24 detailed realism drawings - all in pencil. I still consider those pieces as my best work to date, but I hated the process. Using pencil is very time consuming, messy and I&#8217;ve avoiding it since. Lately I&#8217;ve been working with watercolours a lot. I love its unstructured flow and how the colours blend together effortlessly. I&#8217;ll always use a black pen to add outlines overtop to tie everything together. I&#8217;m generally very happy with the final product.Generally, I work with black pens a lot. I haven&#8217;t done an ink-based drawing in a while, just because it takes a while to finish a piece. I&#8217;m a full-time university student (not in art school, wah) so when I finally have time to do some quality art-ing, there&#8217;s a pretty big chance that I&#8217;ve already changed my idea about a piece and will start over. I like using basic Optiflow pens from Staples. I have black pens from actual art stores but honestly, I go through these so quickly and they work pretty much the same so I tend to buy cheap and in bulk whenever possible. The &#8220;cheap and in bulk&#8221; mentality goes for my paints and paintbrushes too. Liquitex BASICS are inexpensive, come in a variety of colours, and work well, from my experience. I tend to use them on canvas or on wood. I&#8217;m working on a cacti themed piece right now on a piece of wood using BASICS.  My pocket sketchbook is the most useful to me, as I&#8217;m able to use it on break at work, on the streetcar, wherever. If I have my sketchbook and a pen in my bag - I&#8217;m set! I&#8217;m always working on and changing my style, so my materials change accordingly. Hopefully, I&#8217;ll be adding a digital tablet and large scale canvases to the list above in the near future.

Who: Megan Stulberg - student, illustrator, painter & editor of The Continuist zine, living in Toronto, Ontario.

Supplies:

  • Paintbrushes - all sizes, usually flat or round tip. All from Curry’s.
  • Liquitex BASICS acrylic paint (at least 50 tubes lying around my apartment, seriously)
  • Copics coloured markers
  • Canson watercolour paper
  • Simple 12 piece watercolour set
  • Black Optiflow pens
  • Plastic palette  
  • Moleskine pocket sketchbook
  • My precious, precious iPhone 5 for photo references on-the-go.

Why do I like these supplies?

There are certain materials I’ve tried out that I really, really hate. In 2010, I spent four months straight working on three 18x24 detailed realism drawings - all in pencil. I still consider those pieces as my best work to date, but I hated the process. Using pencil is very time consuming, messy and I’ve avoiding it since.

Lately I’ve been working with watercolours a lot. I love its unstructured flow and how the colours blend together effortlessly. I’ll always use a black pen to add outlines overtop to tie everything together. I’m generally very happy with the final product.

Generally, I work with black pens a lot. I haven’t done an ink-based drawing in a while, just because it takes a while to finish a piece. I’m a full-time university student (not in art school, wah) so when I finally have time to do some quality art-ing, there’s a pretty big chance that I’ve already changed my idea about a piece and will start over. I like using basic Optiflow pens from Staples. I have black pens from actual art stores but honestly, I go through these so quickly and they work pretty much the same so I tend to buy cheap and in bulk whenever possible.
 
The “cheap and in bulk” mentality goes for my paints and paintbrushes too. Liquitex BASICS are inexpensive, come in a variety of colours, and work well, from my experience. I tend to use them on canvas or on wood. I’m working on a cacti themed piece right now on a piece of wood using BASICS.  

My pocket sketchbook is the most useful to me, as I’m able to use it on break at work, on the streetcar, wherever. If I have my sketchbook and a pen in my bag - I’m set!

I’m always working on and changing my style, so my materials change accordingly. Hopefully, I’ll be adding a digital tablet and large scale canvases to the list above in the near future.